I’ve had the beginnings of this blog post sitting in my “draft” folder for at least a month. I think there’s something inherently terrifying about writing about myself, and my thoughts. It’s vulnerable in a way that posting a recipe can’t ever be. 
Last month, as a bit of an early birthday present, we went and saw The Mountain Goats (one of my very favorite bands) live. I’d never seen them before, and to be honest hadn’t really been listening to a lot of their music recently. But to me, they’ll always be important as they served as the soundtrack to the first few years of my relationship with Nick; the perfect blend of our two tastes in music: catchy melodies but with really truthful, gritty (and often humorous) lyrics.
Midway through the set they played a song about high school called "You were cool", which I hadn’t heard in a long time as it was never released on an album. It gave me goosebumps to hear it again, and the unshakable feeling that I should listen very closely to the lyrics, and internalize them.
Truth is, I’ve been thinking a lot about high school recently. Probably because this summer marks the 10 year anniversary of my graduation. And while thinking about the past can be pretty pointless, I also find it really helpful to look back every once in a while to better see my trajectory, and hopefully gain a little perspective about where I’ve come from, so to speak.
In particular, I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about this notion that we never really see ourselves like others see us. And if we did, most of us would probably think we were pretty great. Right after I graduated from high school, I ran into the son of one of my parent’s friends at a coffee shop. We didn’t really know each other, but he said something to me that I still remember and think about; he said “my friends and I always thought you were so cool” (spoiler: we became friends, and though we live in different cities he’s still someone I admire a ridiculous amount).
The irony, of course, being that in no way did I feel so cool in high school. I kept mostly to myself, spent hours upon hours in the printmaking classroom (surprise!) and was pretty socially awkward. But there’s something so valuable about hearing things like that, and the exercise of trying to see oneself objectively.
I bet most people in high school were admired by someone they didn’t realize, maybe even someone they didn’t know at all. It’s too bad that we often hear these affirmations a bit too late (“oh man, I had such a crush on you back then”) or not at all.
And then of course, it all comes full circle. Nothing has changed in that regard. Even as adults, though we’ve mostly transcended our most graceless years and hopefully have some semblance of who we are or at least who we strive to be, we’re unable to fully appreciate just how far we’ve really come, just how great we really are. We’re unable to see that there must be people out there who think we’re talented, or intelligent, or funny. Or valuable and worthy of admiration in a million other ways.
Looking back, I’m quite proud of who I was in high school. I was unapologetically myself from a really young age, and I think that’s unusual and brave. I’m sure most people thought I was pretty strange (and possibly intimidating) but there are far worse things to be. And today, I don’t think a ton has changed. I’ve become more at ease with the idea of living life on my own terms; things get easier with time.
For me, the moral of this story is to listen. 
listen when people email my business to tell me they love the things that I make.
listen when friends/family tell me that they want to spend time with me, that I am worthy of their time.
listen when my boss tells me she is grateful for the work I pour so much of myself into.
listen when a stranger compliments me out of the blue.
They are all trying to tell me something I’ve never really allowed myself to hear (but desperately wanted to); they’re all saying “girl, you are cooler than you know”. And I don’t want to realize this in 10 years, I want to realize this now.
I’m listening.
XO
ZoomInfo
I’ve had the beginnings of this blog post sitting in my “draft” folder for at least a month. I think there’s something inherently terrifying about writing about myself, and my thoughts. It’s vulnerable in a way that posting a recipe can’t ever be. 
Last month, as a bit of an early birthday present, we went and saw The Mountain Goats (one of my very favorite bands) live. I’d never seen them before, and to be honest hadn’t really been listening to a lot of their music recently. But to me, they’ll always be important as they served as the soundtrack to the first few years of my relationship with Nick; the perfect blend of our two tastes in music: catchy melodies but with really truthful, gritty (and often humorous) lyrics.
Midway through the set they played a song about high school called "You were cool", which I hadn’t heard in a long time as it was never released on an album. It gave me goosebumps to hear it again, and the unshakable feeling that I should listen very closely to the lyrics, and internalize them.
Truth is, I’ve been thinking a lot about high school recently. Probably because this summer marks the 10 year anniversary of my graduation. And while thinking about the past can be pretty pointless, I also find it really helpful to look back every once in a while to better see my trajectory, and hopefully gain a little perspective about where I’ve come from, so to speak.
In particular, I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about this notion that we never really see ourselves like others see us. And if we did, most of us would probably think we were pretty great. Right after I graduated from high school, I ran into the son of one of my parent’s friends at a coffee shop. We didn’t really know each other, but he said something to me that I still remember and think about; he said “my friends and I always thought you were so cool” (spoiler: we became friends, and though we live in different cities he’s still someone I admire a ridiculous amount).
The irony, of course, being that in no way did I feel so cool in high school. I kept mostly to myself, spent hours upon hours in the printmaking classroom (surprise!) and was pretty socially awkward. But there’s something so valuable about hearing things like that, and the exercise of trying to see oneself objectively.
I bet most people in high school were admired by someone they didn’t realize, maybe even someone they didn’t know at all. It’s too bad that we often hear these affirmations a bit too late (“oh man, I had such a crush on you back then”) or not at all.
And then of course, it all comes full circle. Nothing has changed in that regard. Even as adults, though we’ve mostly transcended our most graceless years and hopefully have some semblance of who we are or at least who we strive to be, we’re unable to fully appreciate just how far we’ve really come, just how great we really are. We’re unable to see that there must be people out there who think we’re talented, or intelligent, or funny. Or valuable and worthy of admiration in a million other ways.
Looking back, I’m quite proud of who I was in high school. I was unapologetically myself from a really young age, and I think that’s unusual and brave. I’m sure most people thought I was pretty strange (and possibly intimidating) but there are far worse things to be. And today, I don’t think a ton has changed. I’ve become more at ease with the idea of living life on my own terms; things get easier with time.
For me, the moral of this story is to listen. 
listen when people email my business to tell me they love the things that I make.
listen when friends/family tell me that they want to spend time with me, that I am worthy of their time.
listen when my boss tells me she is grateful for the work I pour so much of myself into.
listen when a stranger compliments me out of the blue.
They are all trying to tell me something I’ve never really allowed myself to hear (but desperately wanted to); they’re all saying “girl, you are cooler than you know”. And I don’t want to realize this in 10 years, I want to realize this now.
I’m listening.
XO
ZoomInfo

I’ve had the beginnings of this blog post sitting in my “draft” folder for at least a month. I think there’s something inherently terrifying about writing about myself, and my thoughts. It’s vulnerable in a way that posting a recipe can’t ever be. 

Last month, as a bit of an early birthday present, we went and saw The Mountain Goats (one of my very favorite bands) live. I’d never seen them before, and to be honest hadn’t really been listening to a lot of their music recently. But to me, they’ll always be important as they served as the soundtrack to the first few years of my relationship with Nick; the perfect blend of our two tastes in music: catchy melodies but with really truthful, gritty (and often humorous) lyrics.

Midway through the set they played a song about high school called "You were cool", which I hadn’t heard in a long time as it was never released on an album. It gave me goosebumps to hear it again, and the unshakable feeling that I should listen very closely to the lyrics, and internalize them.

Truth is, I’ve been thinking a lot about high school recently. Probably because this summer marks the 10 year anniversary of my graduation. And while thinking about the past can be pretty pointless, I also find it really helpful to look back every once in a while to better see my trajectory, and hopefully gain a little perspective about where I’ve come from, so to speak.

In particular, I’ve been spending a lot of time thinking about this notion that we never really see ourselves like others see us. And if we did, most of us would probably think we were pretty great. Right after I graduated from high school, I ran into the son of one of my parent’s friends at a coffee shop. We didn’t really know each other, but he said something to me that I still remember and think about; he said “my friends and I always thought you were so cool” (spoiler: we became friends, and though we live in different cities he’s still someone I admire a ridiculous amount).

The irony, of course, being that in no way did I feel so cool in high school. I kept mostly to myself, spent hours upon hours in the printmaking classroom (surprise!) and was pretty socially awkward. But there’s something so valuable about hearing things like that, and the exercise of trying to see oneself objectively.

I bet most people in high school were admired by someone they didn’t realize, maybe even someone they didn’t know at all. It’s too bad that we often hear these affirmations a bit too late (“oh man, I had such a crush on you back then”) or not at all.

And then of course, it all comes full circle. Nothing has changed in that regard. Even as adults, though we’ve mostly transcended our most graceless years and hopefully have some semblance of who we are or at least who we strive to be, we’re unable to fully appreciate just how far we’ve really come, just how great we really are. We’re unable to see that there must be people out there who think we’re talented, or intelligent, or funny. Or valuable and worthy of admiration in a million other ways.

Looking back, I’m quite proud of who I was in high school. I was unapologetically myself from a really young age, and I think that’s unusual and brave. I’m sure most people thought I was pretty strange (and possibly intimidating) but there are far worse things to be. And today, I don’t think a ton has changed. I’ve become more at ease with the idea of living life on my own terms; things get easier with time.

For me, the moral of this story is to listen. 

listen when people email my business to tell me they love the things that I make.

listen when friends/family tell me that they want to spend time with me, that I am worthy of their time.

listen when my boss tells me she is grateful for the work I pour so much of myself into.

listen when a stranger compliments me out of the blue.

They are all trying to tell me something I’ve never really allowed myself to hear (but desperately wanted to); they’re all saying “girl, you are cooler than you know”. And I don’t want to realize this in 10 years, I want to realize this now.

I’m listening.

XO

Without giving too much away (not to be vague, just because I’ll be posting more about it soon), this past week has been chock full of all sorts of things I couldn’t control. So, in other words, stress. And lots of it. 
And when this girl is stressed, there’s really only one solution (other than tequila) and it’s a bath. It’s the way I’ve coped with worry, and fatigue, and heartbreak for as long as I can remember. I’m pretty sure a good laugh and a hot bath are the two best cures for anything.
Regardless of all of the obvious emotionally restorative benefits of taking time for oneself in a world full of expectations and obligations, there are also some pretty practical reasons to soak;  lying down in a warm bath with water circulating around your body gives it a much needed break from the constant pull of gravity. 
A few weeks ago I decided that the nightly bath needed a little boost (printing, weight training and stress takes it’s toll), so I came up with a really simple recipe for bath salts made exclusively with ingredients I had around the house. And as a friend mentioned last night, it’s also the season of trauma- with everyone (at least in Portland) out hiking, and sporting, and adventuring. So I think this might just be the perfect answer to everyone’s sore, tired muscles.

H E A L I N G   B A T H   S A L T S
You’ll need:
4 cups epsom salts
20 drops lemon essential oil (it’s both calming + anti-inflammatory)
35 drops trauma oil
Thoroughly mix all ingredients together and store in an airtight jar. I borrowed a tiny little scoop from an old container of laundry detergent that I keep in there, but you could easily sprinkle it into the tub with your hands. Use liberally in the bath.

Here’s to de-compressing + detoxifying.
XO
ZoomInfo
Without giving too much away (not to be vague, just because I’ll be posting more about it soon), this past week has been chock full of all sorts of things I couldn’t control. So, in other words, stress. And lots of it. 
And when this girl is stressed, there’s really only one solution (other than tequila) and it’s a bath. It’s the way I’ve coped with worry, and fatigue, and heartbreak for as long as I can remember. I’m pretty sure a good laugh and a hot bath are the two best cures for anything.
Regardless of all of the obvious emotionally restorative benefits of taking time for oneself in a world full of expectations and obligations, there are also some pretty practical reasons to soak;  lying down in a warm bath with water circulating around your body gives it a much needed break from the constant pull of gravity. 
A few weeks ago I decided that the nightly bath needed a little boost (printing, weight training and stress takes it’s toll), so I came up with a really simple recipe for bath salts made exclusively with ingredients I had around the house. And as a friend mentioned last night, it’s also the season of trauma- with everyone (at least in Portland) out hiking, and sporting, and adventuring. So I think this might just be the perfect answer to everyone’s sore, tired muscles.

H E A L I N G   B A T H   S A L T S
You’ll need:
4 cups epsom salts
20 drops lemon essential oil (it’s both calming + anti-inflammatory)
35 drops trauma oil
Thoroughly mix all ingredients together and store in an airtight jar. I borrowed a tiny little scoop from an old container of laundry detergent that I keep in there, but you could easily sprinkle it into the tub with your hands. Use liberally in the bath.

Here’s to de-compressing + detoxifying.
XO
ZoomInfo

Without giving too much away (not to be vague, just because I’ll be posting more about it soon), this past week has been chock full of all sorts of things I couldn’t control. So, in other words, stress. And lots of it. 

And when this girl is stressed, there’s really only one solution (other than tequila) and it’s a bath. It’s the way I’ve coped with worry, and fatigue, and heartbreak for as long as I can remember. I’m pretty sure a good laugh and a hot bath are the two best cures for anything.

Regardless of all of the obvious emotionally restorative benefits of taking time for oneself in a world full of expectations and obligations, there are also some pretty practical reasons to soak;  lying down in a warm bath with water circulating around your body gives it a much needed break from the constant pull of gravity. 

A few weeks ago I decided that the nightly bath needed a little boost (printing, weight training and stress takes it’s toll), so I came up with a really simple recipe for bath salts made exclusively with ingredients I had around the house. And as a friend mentioned last night, it’s also the season of trauma- with everyone (at least in Portland) out hiking, and sporting, and adventuring. So I think this might just be the perfect answer to everyone’s sore, tired muscles.

H E A L I N G   B A T H   S A L T S

You’ll need:

Thoroughly mix all ingredients together and store in an airtight jar. I borrowed a tiny little scoop from an old container of laundry detergent that I keep in there, but you could easily sprinkle it into the tub with your hands. Use liberally in the bath.

Here’s to de-compressing + detoxifying.

XO

Every once in a while I have a daydream about opening up a sweet little shop nearby. I imagine a sunlit white space filled with beautiful + functional things. I’ve developed quite an obsession with the notion (which Japan and most of Europe seemed to have figured out a while ago) that everything in one’s home should and can be well-made and beautiful. 
In America, we tend to spend money on big ticket items like dining room tables or TVs. And with what little money is left,  we run over to the big box store and buy ugly plastic stuff. And then, inevitably, we want to hide it away because it’s bright blue, and poorly designed, and painful to look at.
But what if all of those utilitarian items that we use everyday we’re really aesthetically pleasing? What if they were made well enough that you could have them for decades? Sure, they’d cost a little bit more up front but you wouldn’t have to hide them away. Hell, you could have them out on full display and people would be like “that fly swatter hanging on your wall is SO charming”- I’m serious, I actually own that fly swatter. It’s entirely charming.
So anyway, I think a little storefront is a far off dream. But I do endeavor to fill my house with products that are made ethically, that function well (this cannot be overlooked) and that are easy on the eyes. As this eco-friendly, made-in-america trend continues to rise there are more and more of these items out there- you’ll even find surprisingly lovely things at your local hardware store.
Here are a few of my favorites:
{clockwise from top left: leather fly swatter, weck jar, dust pan + brush, screwdriver set}
XO
ZoomInfo
Every once in a while I have a daydream about opening up a sweet little shop nearby. I imagine a sunlit white space filled with beautiful + functional things. I’ve developed quite an obsession with the notion (which Japan and most of Europe seemed to have figured out a while ago) that everything in one’s home should and can be well-made and beautiful. 
In America, we tend to spend money on big ticket items like dining room tables or TVs. And with what little money is left,  we run over to the big box store and buy ugly plastic stuff. And then, inevitably, we want to hide it away because it’s bright blue, and poorly designed, and painful to look at.
But what if all of those utilitarian items that we use everyday we’re really aesthetically pleasing? What if they were made well enough that you could have them for decades? Sure, they’d cost a little bit more up front but you wouldn’t have to hide them away. Hell, you could have them out on full display and people would be like “that fly swatter hanging on your wall is SO charming”- I’m serious, I actually own that fly swatter. It’s entirely charming.
So anyway, I think a little storefront is a far off dream. But I do endeavor to fill my house with products that are made ethically, that function well (this cannot be overlooked) and that are easy on the eyes. As this eco-friendly, made-in-america trend continues to rise there are more and more of these items out there- you’ll even find surprisingly lovely things at your local hardware store.
Here are a few of my favorites:
{clockwise from top left: leather fly swatter, weck jar, dust pan + brush, screwdriver set}
XO
ZoomInfo
Every once in a while I have a daydream about opening up a sweet little shop nearby. I imagine a sunlit white space filled with beautiful + functional things. I’ve developed quite an obsession with the notion (which Japan and most of Europe seemed to have figured out a while ago) that everything in one’s home should and can be well-made and beautiful. 
In America, we tend to spend money on big ticket items like dining room tables or TVs. And with what little money is left,  we run over to the big box store and buy ugly plastic stuff. And then, inevitably, we want to hide it away because it’s bright blue, and poorly designed, and painful to look at.
But what if all of those utilitarian items that we use everyday we’re really aesthetically pleasing? What if they were made well enough that you could have them for decades? Sure, they’d cost a little bit more up front but you wouldn’t have to hide them away. Hell, you could have them out on full display and people would be like “that fly swatter hanging on your wall is SO charming”- I’m serious, I actually own that fly swatter. It’s entirely charming.
So anyway, I think a little storefront is a far off dream. But I do endeavor to fill my house with products that are made ethically, that function well (this cannot be overlooked) and that are easy on the eyes. As this eco-friendly, made-in-america trend continues to rise there are more and more of these items out there- you’ll even find surprisingly lovely things at your local hardware store.
Here are a few of my favorites:
{clockwise from top left: leather fly swatter, weck jar, dust pan + brush, screwdriver set}
XO
ZoomInfo
Every once in a while I have a daydream about opening up a sweet little shop nearby. I imagine a sunlit white space filled with beautiful + functional things. I’ve developed quite an obsession with the notion (which Japan and most of Europe seemed to have figured out a while ago) that everything in one’s home should and can be well-made and beautiful. 
In America, we tend to spend money on big ticket items like dining room tables or TVs. And with what little money is left,  we run over to the big box store and buy ugly plastic stuff. And then, inevitably, we want to hide it away because it’s bright blue, and poorly designed, and painful to look at.
But what if all of those utilitarian items that we use everyday we’re really aesthetically pleasing? What if they were made well enough that you could have them for decades? Sure, they’d cost a little bit more up front but you wouldn’t have to hide them away. Hell, you could have them out on full display and people would be like “that fly swatter hanging on your wall is SO charming”- I’m serious, I actually own that fly swatter. It’s entirely charming.
So anyway, I think a little storefront is a far off dream. But I do endeavor to fill my house with products that are made ethically, that function well (this cannot be overlooked) and that are easy on the eyes. As this eco-friendly, made-in-america trend continues to rise there are more and more of these items out there- you’ll even find surprisingly lovely things at your local hardware store.
Here are a few of my favorites:
{clockwise from top left: leather fly swatter, weck jar, dust pan + brush, screwdriver set}
XO
ZoomInfo

Every once in a while I have a daydream about opening up a sweet little shop nearby. I imagine a sunlit white space filled with beautiful + functional things. I’ve developed quite an obsession with the notion (which Japan and most of Europe seemed to have figured out a while ago) that everything in one’s home should and can be well-made and beautiful. 

In America, we tend to spend money on big ticket items like dining room tables or TVs. And with what little money is left,  we run over to the big box store and buy ugly plastic stuff. And then, inevitably, we want to hide it away because it’s bright blue, and poorly designed, and painful to look at.

But what if all of those utilitarian items that we use everyday we’re really aesthetically pleasing? What if they were made well enough that you could have them for decades? Sure, they’d cost a little bit more up front but you wouldn’t have to hide them away. Hell, you could have them out on full display and people would be like “that fly swatter hanging on your wall is SO charming”- I’m serious, I actually own that fly swatter. It’s entirely charming.

So anyway, I think a little storefront is a far off dream. But I do endeavor to fill my house with products that are made ethically, that function well (this cannot be overlooked) and that are easy on the eyes. As this eco-friendly, made-in-america trend continues to rise there are more and more of these items out there- you’ll even find surprisingly lovely things at your local hardware store.

Here are a few of my favorites:

{clockwise from top left: leather fly swatter, weck jar, dust pan + brush, screwdriver set}

XO

"And so with the sunshine and the great bursts of leaves growing on the trees, just as things grow in fast movies, I had that familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer.” -F. Scott Fitzgerald

So, it’s July. How did that happen?
We’ve finally reached the time of year when things in Portland begin to flourish. Green feels like it’s at an all time high around here and I’m in love. I spend a good portion of my free waking hours sitting on the front porch, and tending to the garden.
We have a great little vegetable patch going (carrots, lettuce, peas, tomatoes) but I have to say my very favorite plants in the front are our Cistus (rock rose, pictured in bottom photo) and our Medlar tree (pictured against blue-green house). Both are looking pretty incredible at the moment and don’t require very much water at all.
Also, this arrangement of flowers! Right? I’ve pretty much been replicating it weekly because it just feels so damn summery. 
It’s actually ridiculously simple: blueberry + mock-orange
That’s it. But think it feels both wild, and classic all at once. Bonus? The blueberries ripen throughout the week and you can EAT them. It’s kind of the best.
This whole summer thing is pure magic. Hope you’re soaking up yours.
XO
ZoomInfo
"And so with the sunshine and the great bursts of leaves growing on the trees, just as things grow in fast movies, I had that familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer.” -F. Scott Fitzgerald

So, it’s July. How did that happen?
We’ve finally reached the time of year when things in Portland begin to flourish. Green feels like it’s at an all time high around here and I’m in love. I spend a good portion of my free waking hours sitting on the front porch, and tending to the garden.
We have a great little vegetable patch going (carrots, lettuce, peas, tomatoes) but I have to say my very favorite plants in the front are our Cistus (rock rose, pictured in bottom photo) and our Medlar tree (pictured against blue-green house). Both are looking pretty incredible at the moment and don’t require very much water at all.
Also, this arrangement of flowers! Right? I’ve pretty much been replicating it weekly because it just feels so damn summery. 
It’s actually ridiculously simple: blueberry + mock-orange
That’s it. But think it feels both wild, and classic all at once. Bonus? The blueberries ripen throughout the week and you can EAT them. It’s kind of the best.
This whole summer thing is pure magic. Hope you’re soaking up yours.
XO
ZoomInfo
"And so with the sunshine and the great bursts of leaves growing on the trees, just as things grow in fast movies, I had that familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer.” -F. Scott Fitzgerald

So, it’s July. How did that happen?
We’ve finally reached the time of year when things in Portland begin to flourish. Green feels like it’s at an all time high around here and I’m in love. I spend a good portion of my free waking hours sitting on the front porch, and tending to the garden.
We have a great little vegetable patch going (carrots, lettuce, peas, tomatoes) but I have to say my very favorite plants in the front are our Cistus (rock rose, pictured in bottom photo) and our Medlar tree (pictured against blue-green house). Both are looking pretty incredible at the moment and don’t require very much water at all.
Also, this arrangement of flowers! Right? I’ve pretty much been replicating it weekly because it just feels so damn summery. 
It’s actually ridiculously simple: blueberry + mock-orange
That’s it. But think it feels both wild, and classic all at once. Bonus? The blueberries ripen throughout the week and you can EAT them. It’s kind of the best.
This whole summer thing is pure magic. Hope you’re soaking up yours.
XO
ZoomInfo
"And so with the sunshine and the great bursts of leaves growing on the trees, just as things grow in fast movies, I had that familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer.” -F. Scott Fitzgerald

So, it’s July. How did that happen?
We’ve finally reached the time of year when things in Portland begin to flourish. Green feels like it’s at an all time high around here and I’m in love. I spend a good portion of my free waking hours sitting on the front porch, and tending to the garden.
We have a great little vegetable patch going (carrots, lettuce, peas, tomatoes) but I have to say my very favorite plants in the front are our Cistus (rock rose, pictured in bottom photo) and our Medlar tree (pictured against blue-green house). Both are looking pretty incredible at the moment and don’t require very much water at all.
Also, this arrangement of flowers! Right? I’ve pretty much been replicating it weekly because it just feels so damn summery. 
It’s actually ridiculously simple: blueberry + mock-orange
That’s it. But think it feels both wild, and classic all at once. Bonus? The blueberries ripen throughout the week and you can EAT them. It’s kind of the best.
This whole summer thing is pure magic. Hope you’re soaking up yours.
XO
ZoomInfo

"And so with the sunshine and the great bursts of leaves growing on the trees, just as things grow in fast movies, I had that familiar conviction that life was beginning over again with the summer.” -F. Scott Fitzgerald

So, it’s July. How did that happen?

We’ve finally reached the time of year when things in Portland begin to flourish. Green feels like it’s at an all time high around here and I’m in love. I spend a good portion of my free waking hours sitting on the front porch, and tending to the garden.

We have a great little vegetable patch going (carrots, lettuce, peas, tomatoes) but I have to say my very favorite plants in the front are our Cistus (rock rose, pictured in bottom photo) and our Medlar tree (pictured against blue-green house). Both are looking pretty incredible at the moment and don’t require very much water at all.

Also, this arrangement of flowers! Right? I’ve pretty much been replicating it weekly because it just feels so damn summery. 

It’s actually ridiculously simple: blueberry + mock-orange

That’s it. But think it feels both wild, and classic all at once. Bonus? The blueberries ripen throughout the week and you can EAT them. It’s kind of the best.

This whole summer thing is pure magic. Hope you’re soaking up yours.

XO

"Summer afternoon— summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language"-Henry James
Summer has finally begun (!), and we were lucky to be able to spend the longest day of the year with my mom and her fella who were visiting from San Diego.
They arrived late Thursday night and though I worked Friday morning, we spent the afternoon adventuring around a sunny Portland, and rounded out the day with drinks at Andina and dinner at Bluehour.
Saturday morning we headed out to Timberline Lodge on Mt. Hood, which shockingly enough Nick and I had never been to. It was a bizarre combination of warmish and snowy but the lodge was amazing. Perfectly cozy, and so rich with history. We had lunch overlooking the stunning view, and then headed back down the mountain into the sweet little town of Hood River. 
We grabbed cherries + blueberries at a farm stand, soaked up the sun for a bit, fell in love with some baby goats and finally ended up at Pfriem Family Brewing, which I’d highly recommend; delicious beer, great space and the food looked way more promising than the standard brewery fare. We will definitely be back.
The solstice was celebrated with dinner at Bamboo Sushi (best vegetarian sushi around, by far) and drinks at 23 Hoyt, and then we all fell into bed as soon as the sun set (having fun is really exhausting!).
And finally, we spent Sunday out in Yamhill County wine tasting at Penner Ash, which is my very favorite winery. It’s a lovely spot because you can bring lunch with you, they have plenty of picnic tables and an incredible view. Nick’s mom joined us for a bit, which was fun. It’s always pretty great to have both my San Diego family and my Oregon family all in the same place from time to time.
Dinner at Pok Pok Noi was a lovely end to a lovely weekend. It means so much to me to have my family up here experiencing the world I’ve created for myself over the last 10 years- we were sad to see them leave!
—And then, of course, Nick made us watch the Shining (the exterior shots of the Overlook Hotel in the movie are actually Timberline Lodge).
Let’s do this thing, summer.
ZoomInfo
"Summer afternoon— summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language"-Henry James
Summer has finally begun (!), and we were lucky to be able to spend the longest day of the year with my mom and her fella who were visiting from San Diego.
They arrived late Thursday night and though I worked Friday morning, we spent the afternoon adventuring around a sunny Portland, and rounded out the day with drinks at Andina and dinner at Bluehour.
Saturday morning we headed out to Timberline Lodge on Mt. Hood, which shockingly enough Nick and I had never been to. It was a bizarre combination of warmish and snowy but the lodge was amazing. Perfectly cozy, and so rich with history. We had lunch overlooking the stunning view, and then headed back down the mountain into the sweet little town of Hood River. 
We grabbed cherries + blueberries at a farm stand, soaked up the sun for a bit, fell in love with some baby goats and finally ended up at Pfriem Family Brewing, which I’d highly recommend; delicious beer, great space and the food looked way more promising than the standard brewery fare. We will definitely be back.
The solstice was celebrated with dinner at Bamboo Sushi (best vegetarian sushi around, by far) and drinks at 23 Hoyt, and then we all fell into bed as soon as the sun set (having fun is really exhausting!).
And finally, we spent Sunday out in Yamhill County wine tasting at Penner Ash, which is my very favorite winery. It’s a lovely spot because you can bring lunch with you, they have plenty of picnic tables and an incredible view. Nick’s mom joined us for a bit, which was fun. It’s always pretty great to have both my San Diego family and my Oregon family all in the same place from time to time.
Dinner at Pok Pok Noi was a lovely end to a lovely weekend. It means so much to me to have my family up here experiencing the world I’ve created for myself over the last 10 years- we were sad to see them leave!
—And then, of course, Nick made us watch the Shining (the exterior shots of the Overlook Hotel in the movie are actually Timberline Lodge).
Let’s do this thing, summer.
ZoomInfo
"Summer afternoon— summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language"-Henry James
Summer has finally begun (!), and we were lucky to be able to spend the longest day of the year with my mom and her fella who were visiting from San Diego.
They arrived late Thursday night and though I worked Friday morning, we spent the afternoon adventuring around a sunny Portland, and rounded out the day with drinks at Andina and dinner at Bluehour.
Saturday morning we headed out to Timberline Lodge on Mt. Hood, which shockingly enough Nick and I had never been to. It was a bizarre combination of warmish and snowy but the lodge was amazing. Perfectly cozy, and so rich with history. We had lunch overlooking the stunning view, and then headed back down the mountain into the sweet little town of Hood River. 
We grabbed cherries + blueberries at a farm stand, soaked up the sun for a bit, fell in love with some baby goats and finally ended up at Pfriem Family Brewing, which I’d highly recommend; delicious beer, great space and the food looked way more promising than the standard brewery fare. We will definitely be back.
The solstice was celebrated with dinner at Bamboo Sushi (best vegetarian sushi around, by far) and drinks at 23 Hoyt, and then we all fell into bed as soon as the sun set (having fun is really exhausting!).
And finally, we spent Sunday out in Yamhill County wine tasting at Penner Ash, which is my very favorite winery. It’s a lovely spot because you can bring lunch with you, they have plenty of picnic tables and an incredible view. Nick’s mom joined us for a bit, which was fun. It’s always pretty great to have both my San Diego family and my Oregon family all in the same place from time to time.
Dinner at Pok Pok Noi was a lovely end to a lovely weekend. It means so much to me to have my family up here experiencing the world I’ve created for myself over the last 10 years- we were sad to see them leave!
—And then, of course, Nick made us watch the Shining (the exterior shots of the Overlook Hotel in the movie are actually Timberline Lodge).
Let’s do this thing, summer.
ZoomInfo
"Summer afternoon— summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language"-Henry James
Summer has finally begun (!), and we were lucky to be able to spend the longest day of the year with my mom and her fella who were visiting from San Diego.
They arrived late Thursday night and though I worked Friday morning, we spent the afternoon adventuring around a sunny Portland, and rounded out the day with drinks at Andina and dinner at Bluehour.
Saturday morning we headed out to Timberline Lodge on Mt. Hood, which shockingly enough Nick and I had never been to. It was a bizarre combination of warmish and snowy but the lodge was amazing. Perfectly cozy, and so rich with history. We had lunch overlooking the stunning view, and then headed back down the mountain into the sweet little town of Hood River. 
We grabbed cherries + blueberries at a farm stand, soaked up the sun for a bit, fell in love with some baby goats and finally ended up at Pfriem Family Brewing, which I’d highly recommend; delicious beer, great space and the food looked way more promising than the standard brewery fare. We will definitely be back.
The solstice was celebrated with dinner at Bamboo Sushi (best vegetarian sushi around, by far) and drinks at 23 Hoyt, and then we all fell into bed as soon as the sun set (having fun is really exhausting!).
And finally, we spent Sunday out in Yamhill County wine tasting at Penner Ash, which is my very favorite winery. It’s a lovely spot because you can bring lunch with you, they have plenty of picnic tables and an incredible view. Nick’s mom joined us for a bit, which was fun. It’s always pretty great to have both my San Diego family and my Oregon family all in the same place from time to time.
Dinner at Pok Pok Noi was a lovely end to a lovely weekend. It means so much to me to have my family up here experiencing the world I’ve created for myself over the last 10 years- we were sad to see them leave!
—And then, of course, Nick made us watch the Shining (the exterior shots of the Overlook Hotel in the movie are actually Timberline Lodge).
Let’s do this thing, summer.
ZoomInfo
"Summer afternoon— summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language"-Henry James
Summer has finally begun (!), and we were lucky to be able to spend the longest day of the year with my mom and her fella who were visiting from San Diego.
They arrived late Thursday night and though I worked Friday morning, we spent the afternoon adventuring around a sunny Portland, and rounded out the day with drinks at Andina and dinner at Bluehour.
Saturday morning we headed out to Timberline Lodge on Mt. Hood, which shockingly enough Nick and I had never been to. It was a bizarre combination of warmish and snowy but the lodge was amazing. Perfectly cozy, and so rich with history. We had lunch overlooking the stunning view, and then headed back down the mountain into the sweet little town of Hood River. 
We grabbed cherries + blueberries at a farm stand, soaked up the sun for a bit, fell in love with some baby goats and finally ended up at Pfriem Family Brewing, which I’d highly recommend; delicious beer, great space and the food looked way more promising than the standard brewery fare. We will definitely be back.
The solstice was celebrated with dinner at Bamboo Sushi (best vegetarian sushi around, by far) and drinks at 23 Hoyt, and then we all fell into bed as soon as the sun set (having fun is really exhausting!).
And finally, we spent Sunday out in Yamhill County wine tasting at Penner Ash, which is my very favorite winery. It’s a lovely spot because you can bring lunch with you, they have plenty of picnic tables and an incredible view. Nick’s mom joined us for a bit, which was fun. It’s always pretty great to have both my San Diego family and my Oregon family all in the same place from time to time.
Dinner at Pok Pok Noi was a lovely end to a lovely weekend. It means so much to me to have my family up here experiencing the world I’ve created for myself over the last 10 years- we were sad to see them leave!
—And then, of course, Nick made us watch the Shining (the exterior shots of the Overlook Hotel in the movie are actually Timberline Lodge).
Let’s do this thing, summer.
ZoomInfo
"Summer afternoon— summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language"-Henry James
Summer has finally begun (!), and we were lucky to be able to spend the longest day of the year with my mom and her fella who were visiting from San Diego.
They arrived late Thursday night and though I worked Friday morning, we spent the afternoon adventuring around a sunny Portland, and rounded out the day with drinks at Andina and dinner at Bluehour.
Saturday morning we headed out to Timberline Lodge on Mt. Hood, which shockingly enough Nick and I had never been to. It was a bizarre combination of warmish and snowy but the lodge was amazing. Perfectly cozy, and so rich with history. We had lunch overlooking the stunning view, and then headed back down the mountain into the sweet little town of Hood River. 
We grabbed cherries + blueberries at a farm stand, soaked up the sun for a bit, fell in love with some baby goats and finally ended up at Pfriem Family Brewing, which I’d highly recommend; delicious beer, great space and the food looked way more promising than the standard brewery fare. We will definitely be back.
The solstice was celebrated with dinner at Bamboo Sushi (best vegetarian sushi around, by far) and drinks at 23 Hoyt, and then we all fell into bed as soon as the sun set (having fun is really exhausting!).
And finally, we spent Sunday out in Yamhill County wine tasting at Penner Ash, which is my very favorite winery. It’s a lovely spot because you can bring lunch with you, they have plenty of picnic tables and an incredible view. Nick’s mom joined us for a bit, which was fun. It’s always pretty great to have both my San Diego family and my Oregon family all in the same place from time to time.
Dinner at Pok Pok Noi was a lovely end to a lovely weekend. It means so much to me to have my family up here experiencing the world I’ve created for myself over the last 10 years- we were sad to see them leave!
—And then, of course, Nick made us watch the Shining (the exterior shots of the Overlook Hotel in the movie are actually Timberline Lodge).
Let’s do this thing, summer.
ZoomInfo
"Summer afternoon— summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language"-Henry James
Summer has finally begun (!), and we were lucky to be able to spend the longest day of the year with my mom and her fella who were visiting from San Diego.
They arrived late Thursday night and though I worked Friday morning, we spent the afternoon adventuring around a sunny Portland, and rounded out the day with drinks at Andina and dinner at Bluehour.
Saturday morning we headed out to Timberline Lodge on Mt. Hood, which shockingly enough Nick and I had never been to. It was a bizarre combination of warmish and snowy but the lodge was amazing. Perfectly cozy, and so rich with history. We had lunch overlooking the stunning view, and then headed back down the mountain into the sweet little town of Hood River. 
We grabbed cherries + blueberries at a farm stand, soaked up the sun for a bit, fell in love with some baby goats and finally ended up at Pfriem Family Brewing, which I’d highly recommend; delicious beer, great space and the food looked way more promising than the standard brewery fare. We will definitely be back.
The solstice was celebrated with dinner at Bamboo Sushi (best vegetarian sushi around, by far) and drinks at 23 Hoyt, and then we all fell into bed as soon as the sun set (having fun is really exhausting!).
And finally, we spent Sunday out in Yamhill County wine tasting at Penner Ash, which is my very favorite winery. It’s a lovely spot because you can bring lunch with you, they have plenty of picnic tables and an incredible view. Nick’s mom joined us for a bit, which was fun. It’s always pretty great to have both my San Diego family and my Oregon family all in the same place from time to time.
Dinner at Pok Pok Noi was a lovely end to a lovely weekend. It means so much to me to have my family up here experiencing the world I’ve created for myself over the last 10 years- we were sad to see them leave!
—And then, of course, Nick made us watch the Shining (the exterior shots of the Overlook Hotel in the movie are actually Timberline Lodge).
Let’s do this thing, summer.
ZoomInfo
"Summer afternoon— summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language"-Henry James
Summer has finally begun (!), and we were lucky to be able to spend the longest day of the year with my mom and her fella who were visiting from San Diego.
They arrived late Thursday night and though I worked Friday morning, we spent the afternoon adventuring around a sunny Portland, and rounded out the day with drinks at Andina and dinner at Bluehour.
Saturday morning we headed out to Timberline Lodge on Mt. Hood, which shockingly enough Nick and I had never been to. It was a bizarre combination of warmish and snowy but the lodge was amazing. Perfectly cozy, and so rich with history. We had lunch overlooking the stunning view, and then headed back down the mountain into the sweet little town of Hood River. 
We grabbed cherries + blueberries at a farm stand, soaked up the sun for a bit, fell in love with some baby goats and finally ended up at Pfriem Family Brewing, which I’d highly recommend; delicious beer, great space and the food looked way more promising than the standard brewery fare. We will definitely be back.
The solstice was celebrated with dinner at Bamboo Sushi (best vegetarian sushi around, by far) and drinks at 23 Hoyt, and then we all fell into bed as soon as the sun set (having fun is really exhausting!).
And finally, we spent Sunday out in Yamhill County wine tasting at Penner Ash, which is my very favorite winery. It’s a lovely spot because you can bring lunch with you, they have plenty of picnic tables and an incredible view. Nick’s mom joined us for a bit, which was fun. It’s always pretty great to have both my San Diego family and my Oregon family all in the same place from time to time.
Dinner at Pok Pok Noi was a lovely end to a lovely weekend. It means so much to me to have my family up here experiencing the world I’ve created for myself over the last 10 years- we were sad to see them leave!
—And then, of course, Nick made us watch the Shining (the exterior shots of the Overlook Hotel in the movie are actually Timberline Lodge).
Let’s do this thing, summer.
ZoomInfo
"Summer afternoon— summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language"-Henry James
Summer has finally begun (!), and we were lucky to be able to spend the longest day of the year with my mom and her fella who were visiting from San Diego.
They arrived late Thursday night and though I worked Friday morning, we spent the afternoon adventuring around a sunny Portland, and rounded out the day with drinks at Andina and dinner at Bluehour.
Saturday morning we headed out to Timberline Lodge on Mt. Hood, which shockingly enough Nick and I had never been to. It was a bizarre combination of warmish and snowy but the lodge was amazing. Perfectly cozy, and so rich with history. We had lunch overlooking the stunning view, and then headed back down the mountain into the sweet little town of Hood River. 
We grabbed cherries + blueberries at a farm stand, soaked up the sun for a bit, fell in love with some baby goats and finally ended up at Pfriem Family Brewing, which I’d highly recommend; delicious beer, great space and the food looked way more promising than the standard brewery fare. We will definitely be back.
The solstice was celebrated with dinner at Bamboo Sushi (best vegetarian sushi around, by far) and drinks at 23 Hoyt, and then we all fell into bed as soon as the sun set (having fun is really exhausting!).
And finally, we spent Sunday out in Yamhill County wine tasting at Penner Ash, which is my very favorite winery. It’s a lovely spot because you can bring lunch with you, they have plenty of picnic tables and an incredible view. Nick’s mom joined us for a bit, which was fun. It’s always pretty great to have both my San Diego family and my Oregon family all in the same place from time to time.
Dinner at Pok Pok Noi was a lovely end to a lovely weekend. It means so much to me to have my family up here experiencing the world I’ve created for myself over the last 10 years- we were sad to see them leave!
—And then, of course, Nick made us watch the Shining (the exterior shots of the Overlook Hotel in the movie are actually Timberline Lodge).
Let’s do this thing, summer.
ZoomInfo
"Summer afternoon— summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language"-Henry James
Summer has finally begun (!), and we were lucky to be able to spend the longest day of the year with my mom and her fella who were visiting from San Diego.
They arrived late Thursday night and though I worked Friday morning, we spent the afternoon adventuring around a sunny Portland, and rounded out the day with drinks at Andina and dinner at Bluehour.
Saturday morning we headed out to Timberline Lodge on Mt. Hood, which shockingly enough Nick and I had never been to. It was a bizarre combination of warmish and snowy but the lodge was amazing. Perfectly cozy, and so rich with history. We had lunch overlooking the stunning view, and then headed back down the mountain into the sweet little town of Hood River. 
We grabbed cherries + blueberries at a farm stand, soaked up the sun for a bit, fell in love with some baby goats and finally ended up at Pfriem Family Brewing, which I’d highly recommend; delicious beer, great space and the food looked way more promising than the standard brewery fare. We will definitely be back.
The solstice was celebrated with dinner at Bamboo Sushi (best vegetarian sushi around, by far) and drinks at 23 Hoyt, and then we all fell into bed as soon as the sun set (having fun is really exhausting!).
And finally, we spent Sunday out in Yamhill County wine tasting at Penner Ash, which is my very favorite winery. It’s a lovely spot because you can bring lunch with you, they have plenty of picnic tables and an incredible view. Nick’s mom joined us for a bit, which was fun. It’s always pretty great to have both my San Diego family and my Oregon family all in the same place from time to time.
Dinner at Pok Pok Noi was a lovely end to a lovely weekend. It means so much to me to have my family up here experiencing the world I’ve created for myself over the last 10 years- we were sad to see them leave!
—And then, of course, Nick made us watch the Shining (the exterior shots of the Overlook Hotel in the movie are actually Timberline Lodge).
Let’s do this thing, summer.
ZoomInfo

"Summer afternoon— summer afternoon; to me those have always been the two most beautiful words in the English language"-Henry James

Summer has finally begun (!), and we were lucky to be able to spend the longest day of the year with my mom and her fella who were visiting from San Diego.

They arrived late Thursday night and though I worked Friday morning, we spent the afternoon adventuring around a sunny Portland, and rounded out the day with drinks at Andina and dinner at Bluehour.

Saturday morning we headed out to Timberline Lodge on Mt. Hood, which shockingly enough Nick and I had never been to. It was a bizarre combination of warmish and snowy but the lodge was amazing. Perfectly cozy, and so rich with history. We had lunch overlooking the stunning view, and then headed back down the mountain into the sweet little town of Hood River. 

We grabbed cherries + blueberries at a farm stand, soaked up the sun for a bit, fell in love with some baby goats and finally ended up at Pfriem Family Brewing, which I’d highly recommend; delicious beer, great space and the food looked way more promising than the standard brewery fare. We will definitely be back.

The solstice was celebrated with dinner at Bamboo Sushi (best vegetarian sushi around, by far) and drinks at 23 Hoyt, and then we all fell into bed as soon as the sun set (having fun is really exhausting!).

And finally, we spent Sunday out in Yamhill County wine tasting at Penner Ash, which is my very favorite winery. It’s a lovely spot because you can bring lunch with you, they have plenty of picnic tables and an incredible view. Nick’s mom joined us for a bit, which was fun. It’s always pretty great to have both my San Diego family and my Oregon family all in the same place from time to time.

Dinner at Pok Pok Noi was a lovely end to a lovely weekend. It means so much to me to have my family up here experiencing the world I’ve created for myself over the last 10 years- we were sad to see them leave!

—And then, of course, Nick made us watch the Shining (the exterior shots of the Overlook Hotel in the movie are actually Timberline Lodge).

Let’s do this thing, summer.

It finally happened. Margarita season is upon us! And along with that comes the inevitable season of tacos.
Every Monday during the warm months is Margarita Monday, and if we’re not feeling up to going out or if we have stuff to get done around the house, we make margaritas and some sort of tacos.
Recently it’s been roasting up whatever veggies we have on hand, along with beans and cilantro rice and filling some soft corn tortillas. Occasionally we also add in some crumbled tempeh (and some cashew poblano crema if we’re really lucky) . But I was itching to try something new, and remembered my friend Meghan mentioning an amazing recipe she’d found for walnut crumbles and we just happened to have some on hand!
Verdict? It’s amazing. I think even omnivores would find this both delicious and satisfying, which (let’s get real) I can’t say about a whole lot of vegetarian recipes.
Here’s the recipe from the amazing Oh She Glows blog:
Walnut Taco Meat (yield: scant 1/2 cup)
1/2 cup walnuts, soaked for 2-8 hours
1 + 1/2 tsp chili powder
1/2 tsp cumin powder
fine grain sea salt to taste
cayenne pepper, to taste (optional)
In a food processor (or by hand), pulse (or chop) the ingredients until combined. Make sure to leave the walnuts chunky.
We doubled this recipe, and mixed black beans and fresh corn in with the walnuts. We topped with avocado, pico de gallo, and a sprinkle of cotija cheese and it was beyond delicious.
Do it! Make it! Eat it now!
ZoomInfo
It finally happened. Margarita season is upon us! And along with that comes the inevitable season of tacos.
Every Monday during the warm months is Margarita Monday, and if we’re not feeling up to going out or if we have stuff to get done around the house, we make margaritas and some sort of tacos.
Recently it’s been roasting up whatever veggies we have on hand, along with beans and cilantro rice and filling some soft corn tortillas. Occasionally we also add in some crumbled tempeh (and some cashew poblano crema if we’re really lucky) . But I was itching to try something new, and remembered my friend Meghan mentioning an amazing recipe she’d found for walnut crumbles and we just happened to have some on hand!
Verdict? It’s amazing. I think even omnivores would find this both delicious and satisfying, which (let’s get real) I can’t say about a whole lot of vegetarian recipes.
Here’s the recipe from the amazing Oh She Glows blog:
Walnut Taco Meat (yield: scant 1/2 cup)
1/2 cup walnuts, soaked for 2-8 hours
1 + 1/2 tsp chili powder
1/2 tsp cumin powder
fine grain sea salt to taste
cayenne pepper, to taste (optional)
In a food processor (or by hand), pulse (or chop) the ingredients until combined. Make sure to leave the walnuts chunky.
We doubled this recipe, and mixed black beans and fresh corn in with the walnuts. We topped with avocado, pico de gallo, and a sprinkle of cotija cheese and it was beyond delicious.
Do it! Make it! Eat it now!
ZoomInfo

It finally happened. Margarita season is upon us! And along with that comes the inevitable season of tacos.

Every Monday during the warm months is Margarita Monday, and if we’re not feeling up to going out or if we have stuff to get done around the house, we make margaritas and some sort of tacos.

Recently it’s been roasting up whatever veggies we have on hand, along with beans and cilantro rice and filling some soft corn tortillas. Occasionally we also add in some crumbled tempeh (and some cashew poblano crema if we’re really lucky) . But I was itching to try something new, and remembered my friend Meghan mentioning an amazing recipe she’d found for walnut crumbles and we just happened to have some on hand!

Verdict? It’s amazing. I think even omnivores would find this both delicious and satisfying, which (let’s get real) I can’t say about a whole lot of vegetarian recipes.

Here’s the recipe from the amazing Oh She Glows blog:

Walnut Taco Meat (yield: scant 1/2 cup)

  • 1/2 cup walnuts, soaked for 2-8 hours
  • 1 + 1/2 tsp chili powder
  • 1/2 tsp cumin powder
  • fine grain sea salt to taste
  • cayenne pepper, to taste (optional)

In a food processor (or by hand), pulse (or chop) the ingredients until combined. Make sure to leave the walnuts chunky.

We doubled this recipe, and mixed black beans and fresh corn in with the walnuts. We topped with avocado, pico de gallo, and a sprinkle of cotija cheese and it was beyond delicious.

Do it! Make it! Eat it now!

28, I like you already.
We spent this last weekend in Seattle visiting family and celebrating my birthday and it was beyond lovely, despite the rain.
Nick’s brother + wife moved up there last fall, and we’d been looking for any excuse to go up there and drink beer with them (if I’m being completely honest). Last summer’s weekend in Seattle was insanely magical (the sunshine helped) so we were eager to re-visit some of our favorite spots with some of our favorite people.
Well, turns out it’s June. And June in the Pacific Northwest is entirely hit or miss when it comes to weather. It’s been warm and sunny both in Portland and Seattle recently, but like clockwork Friday came around and so did the rain. And it just kind of lingered all weekend long. 
Did it stop us? Definitely not- we’re Portland people. If rain stopped us we’d be seriously screwed.
We arrived late morning on Saturday and headed to Ballard to grab lunch (also picked up some amazing new flats), followed by chocolate and beer in Fremont, Gasworks Park, + birthday dinner Downtown.
Sunday was filled with Vodka/Gin tasting, a brief walk through the market, Mac + Cheese at Beecher’s, Moorea Seal’s brick + mortar, and finally Essex + Delancey for drinks/dinner.
And I saved the best for last. Monday was forecasted to be the nicest of the three days, so we held out on making the trip to Greenlake until then. I posted a bit about Greenlake last summer (charming man-made lake in Seattle, no motorized boats allowed), but it’s most certainly one of my favorite places on earth. By 11am on Monday, it was still cold and rainy but we needed to head back to Portland soonish so we made the quick trip to the lake. We wandered around for a bit, but decided it was just too cold out. We made a pact to visit later in the summer when it was sure to be sunny. Nick stopped to use the bathroom on the way back to the car, and in those few minutes the sun broke. And suddenly there was blue sky, and it was what felt like 15 degrees warmer. Magic, right? So we stayed a while and soaked it up.
It was a perfect way to welcome 28. I have a feeling it’s going to be a really, really great year.

XO
ZoomInfo
28, I like you already.
We spent this last weekend in Seattle visiting family and celebrating my birthday and it was beyond lovely, despite the rain.
Nick’s brother + wife moved up there last fall, and we’d been looking for any excuse to go up there and drink beer with them (if I’m being completely honest). Last summer’s weekend in Seattle was insanely magical (the sunshine helped) so we were eager to re-visit some of our favorite spots with some of our favorite people.
Well, turns out it’s June. And June in the Pacific Northwest is entirely hit or miss when it comes to weather. It’s been warm and sunny both in Portland and Seattle recently, but like clockwork Friday came around and so did the rain. And it just kind of lingered all weekend long. 
Did it stop us? Definitely not- we’re Portland people. If rain stopped us we’d be seriously screwed.
We arrived late morning on Saturday and headed to Ballard to grab lunch (also picked up some amazing new flats), followed by chocolate and beer in Fremont, Gasworks Park, + birthday dinner Downtown.
Sunday was filled with Vodka/Gin tasting, a brief walk through the market, Mac + Cheese at Beecher’s, Moorea Seal’s brick + mortar, and finally Essex + Delancey for drinks/dinner.
And I saved the best for last. Monday was forecasted to be the nicest of the three days, so we held out on making the trip to Greenlake until then. I posted a bit about Greenlake last summer (charming man-made lake in Seattle, no motorized boats allowed), but it’s most certainly one of my favorite places on earth. By 11am on Monday, it was still cold and rainy but we needed to head back to Portland soonish so we made the quick trip to the lake. We wandered around for a bit, but decided it was just too cold out. We made a pact to visit later in the summer when it was sure to be sunny. Nick stopped to use the bathroom on the way back to the car, and in those few minutes the sun broke. And suddenly there was blue sky, and it was what felt like 15 degrees warmer. Magic, right? So we stayed a while and soaked it up.
It was a perfect way to welcome 28. I have a feeling it’s going to be a really, really great year.

XO
ZoomInfo
28, I like you already.
We spent this last weekend in Seattle visiting family and celebrating my birthday and it was beyond lovely, despite the rain.
Nick’s brother + wife moved up there last fall, and we’d been looking for any excuse to go up there and drink beer with them (if I’m being completely honest). Last summer’s weekend in Seattle was insanely magical (the sunshine helped) so we were eager to re-visit some of our favorite spots with some of our favorite people.
Well, turns out it’s June. And June in the Pacific Northwest is entirely hit or miss when it comes to weather. It’s been warm and sunny both in Portland and Seattle recently, but like clockwork Friday came around and so did the rain. And it just kind of lingered all weekend long. 
Did it stop us? Definitely not- we’re Portland people. If rain stopped us we’d be seriously screwed.
We arrived late morning on Saturday and headed to Ballard to grab lunch (also picked up some amazing new flats), followed by chocolate and beer in Fremont, Gasworks Park, + birthday dinner Downtown.
Sunday was filled with Vodka/Gin tasting, a brief walk through the market, Mac + Cheese at Beecher’s, Moorea Seal’s brick + mortar, and finally Essex + Delancey for drinks/dinner.
And I saved the best for last. Monday was forecasted to be the nicest of the three days, so we held out on making the trip to Greenlake until then. I posted a bit about Greenlake last summer (charming man-made lake in Seattle, no motorized boats allowed), but it’s most certainly one of my favorite places on earth. By 11am on Monday, it was still cold and rainy but we needed to head back to Portland soonish so we made the quick trip to the lake. We wandered around for a bit, but decided it was just too cold out. We made a pact to visit later in the summer when it was sure to be sunny. Nick stopped to use the bathroom on the way back to the car, and in those few minutes the sun broke. And suddenly there was blue sky, and it was what felt like 15 degrees warmer. Magic, right? So we stayed a while and soaked it up.
It was a perfect way to welcome 28. I have a feeling it’s going to be a really, really great year.

XO
ZoomInfo
28, I like you already.
We spent this last weekend in Seattle visiting family and celebrating my birthday and it was beyond lovely, despite the rain.
Nick’s brother + wife moved up there last fall, and we’d been looking for any excuse to go up there and drink beer with them (if I’m being completely honest). Last summer’s weekend in Seattle was insanely magical (the sunshine helped) so we were eager to re-visit some of our favorite spots with some of our favorite people.
Well, turns out it’s June. And June in the Pacific Northwest is entirely hit or miss when it comes to weather. It’s been warm and sunny both in Portland and Seattle recently, but like clockwork Friday came around and so did the rain. And it just kind of lingered all weekend long. 
Did it stop us? Definitely not- we’re Portland people. If rain stopped us we’d be seriously screwed.
We arrived late morning on Saturday and headed to Ballard to grab lunch (also picked up some amazing new flats), followed by chocolate and beer in Fremont, Gasworks Park, + birthday dinner Downtown.
Sunday was filled with Vodka/Gin tasting, a brief walk through the market, Mac + Cheese at Beecher’s, Moorea Seal’s brick + mortar, and finally Essex + Delancey for drinks/dinner.
And I saved the best for last. Monday was forecasted to be the nicest of the three days, so we held out on making the trip to Greenlake until then. I posted a bit about Greenlake last summer (charming man-made lake in Seattle, no motorized boats allowed), but it’s most certainly one of my favorite places on earth. By 11am on Monday, it was still cold and rainy but we needed to head back to Portland soonish so we made the quick trip to the lake. We wandered around for a bit, but decided it was just too cold out. We made a pact to visit later in the summer when it was sure to be sunny. Nick stopped to use the bathroom on the way back to the car, and in those few minutes the sun broke. And suddenly there was blue sky, and it was what felt like 15 degrees warmer. Magic, right? So we stayed a while and soaked it up.
It was a perfect way to welcome 28. I have a feeling it’s going to be a really, really great year.

XO
ZoomInfo
28, I like you already.
We spent this last weekend in Seattle visiting family and celebrating my birthday and it was beyond lovely, despite the rain.
Nick’s brother + wife moved up there last fall, and we’d been looking for any excuse to go up there and drink beer with them (if I’m being completely honest). Last summer’s weekend in Seattle was insanely magical (the sunshine helped) so we were eager to re-visit some of our favorite spots with some of our favorite people.
Well, turns out it’s June. And June in the Pacific Northwest is entirely hit or miss when it comes to weather. It’s been warm and sunny both in Portland and Seattle recently, but like clockwork Friday came around and so did the rain. And it just kind of lingered all weekend long. 
Did it stop us? Definitely not- we’re Portland people. If rain stopped us we’d be seriously screwed.
We arrived late morning on Saturday and headed to Ballard to grab lunch (also picked up some amazing new flats), followed by chocolate and beer in Fremont, Gasworks Park, + birthday dinner Downtown.
Sunday was filled with Vodka/Gin tasting, a brief walk through the market, Mac + Cheese at Beecher’s, Moorea Seal’s brick + mortar, and finally Essex + Delancey for drinks/dinner.
And I saved the best for last. Monday was forecasted to be the nicest of the three days, so we held out on making the trip to Greenlake until then. I posted a bit about Greenlake last summer (charming man-made lake in Seattle, no motorized boats allowed), but it’s most certainly one of my favorite places on earth. By 11am on Monday, it was still cold and rainy but we needed to head back to Portland soonish so we made the quick trip to the lake. We wandered around for a bit, but decided it was just too cold out. We made a pact to visit later in the summer when it was sure to be sunny. Nick stopped to use the bathroom on the way back to the car, and in those few minutes the sun broke. And suddenly there was blue sky, and it was what felt like 15 degrees warmer. Magic, right? So we stayed a while and soaked it up.
It was a perfect way to welcome 28. I have a feeling it’s going to be a really, really great year.

XO
ZoomInfo
28, I like you already.
We spent this last weekend in Seattle visiting family and celebrating my birthday and it was beyond lovely, despite the rain.
Nick’s brother + wife moved up there last fall, and we’d been looking for any excuse to go up there and drink beer with them (if I’m being completely honest). Last summer’s weekend in Seattle was insanely magical (the sunshine helped) so we were eager to re-visit some of our favorite spots with some of our favorite people.
Well, turns out it’s June. And June in the Pacific Northwest is entirely hit or miss when it comes to weather. It’s been warm and sunny both in Portland and Seattle recently, but like clockwork Friday came around and so did the rain. And it just kind of lingered all weekend long. 
Did it stop us? Definitely not- we’re Portland people. If rain stopped us we’d be seriously screwed.
We arrived late morning on Saturday and headed to Ballard to grab lunch (also picked up some amazing new flats), followed by chocolate and beer in Fremont, Gasworks Park, + birthday dinner Downtown.
Sunday was filled with Vodka/Gin tasting, a brief walk through the market, Mac + Cheese at Beecher’s, Moorea Seal’s brick + mortar, and finally Essex + Delancey for drinks/dinner.
And I saved the best for last. Monday was forecasted to be the nicest of the three days, so we held out on making the trip to Greenlake until then. I posted a bit about Greenlake last summer (charming man-made lake in Seattle, no motorized boats allowed), but it’s most certainly one of my favorite places on earth. By 11am on Monday, it was still cold and rainy but we needed to head back to Portland soonish so we made the quick trip to the lake. We wandered around for a bit, but decided it was just too cold out. We made a pact to visit later in the summer when it was sure to be sunny. Nick stopped to use the bathroom on the way back to the car, and in those few minutes the sun broke. And suddenly there was blue sky, and it was what felt like 15 degrees warmer. Magic, right? So we stayed a while and soaked it up.
It was a perfect way to welcome 28. I have a feeling it’s going to be a really, really great year.

XO
ZoomInfo
28, I like you already.
We spent this last weekend in Seattle visiting family and celebrating my birthday and it was beyond lovely, despite the rain.
Nick’s brother + wife moved up there last fall, and we’d been looking for any excuse to go up there and drink beer with them (if I’m being completely honest). Last summer’s weekend in Seattle was insanely magical (the sunshine helped) so we were eager to re-visit some of our favorite spots with some of our favorite people.
Well, turns out it’s June. And June in the Pacific Northwest is entirely hit or miss when it comes to weather. It’s been warm and sunny both in Portland and Seattle recently, but like clockwork Friday came around and so did the rain. And it just kind of lingered all weekend long. 
Did it stop us? Definitely not- we’re Portland people. If rain stopped us we’d be seriously screwed.
We arrived late morning on Saturday and headed to Ballard to grab lunch (also picked up some amazing new flats), followed by chocolate and beer in Fremont, Gasworks Park, + birthday dinner Downtown.
Sunday was filled with Vodka/Gin tasting, a brief walk through the market, Mac + Cheese at Beecher’s, Moorea Seal’s brick + mortar, and finally Essex + Delancey for drinks/dinner.
And I saved the best for last. Monday was forecasted to be the nicest of the three days, so we held out on making the trip to Greenlake until then. I posted a bit about Greenlake last summer (charming man-made lake in Seattle, no motorized boats allowed), but it’s most certainly one of my favorite places on earth. By 11am on Monday, it was still cold and rainy but we needed to head back to Portland soonish so we made the quick trip to the lake. We wandered around for a bit, but decided it was just too cold out. We made a pact to visit later in the summer when it was sure to be sunny. Nick stopped to use the bathroom on the way back to the car, and in those few minutes the sun broke. And suddenly there was blue sky, and it was what felt like 15 degrees warmer. Magic, right? So we stayed a while and soaked it up.
It was a perfect way to welcome 28. I have a feeling it’s going to be a really, really great year.

XO
ZoomInfo
28, I like you already.
We spent this last weekend in Seattle visiting family and celebrating my birthday and it was beyond lovely, despite the rain.
Nick’s brother + wife moved up there last fall, and we’d been looking for any excuse to go up there and drink beer with them (if I’m being completely honest). Last summer’s weekend in Seattle was insanely magical (the sunshine helped) so we were eager to re-visit some of our favorite spots with some of our favorite people.
Well, turns out it’s June. And June in the Pacific Northwest is entirely hit or miss when it comes to weather. It’s been warm and sunny both in Portland and Seattle recently, but like clockwork Friday came around and so did the rain. And it just kind of lingered all weekend long. 
Did it stop us? Definitely not- we’re Portland people. If rain stopped us we’d be seriously screwed.
We arrived late morning on Saturday and headed to Ballard to grab lunch (also picked up some amazing new flats), followed by chocolate and beer in Fremont, Gasworks Park, + birthday dinner Downtown.
Sunday was filled with Vodka/Gin tasting, a brief walk through the market, Mac + Cheese at Beecher’s, Moorea Seal’s brick + mortar, and finally Essex + Delancey for drinks/dinner.
And I saved the best for last. Monday was forecasted to be the nicest of the three days, so we held out on making the trip to Greenlake until then. I posted a bit about Greenlake last summer (charming man-made lake in Seattle, no motorized boats allowed), but it’s most certainly one of my favorite places on earth. By 11am on Monday, it was still cold and rainy but we needed to head back to Portland soonish so we made the quick trip to the lake. We wandered around for a bit, but decided it was just too cold out. We made a pact to visit later in the summer when it was sure to be sunny. Nick stopped to use the bathroom on the way back to the car, and in those few minutes the sun broke. And suddenly there was blue sky, and it was what felt like 15 degrees warmer. Magic, right? So we stayed a while and soaked it up.
It was a perfect way to welcome 28. I have a feeling it’s going to be a really, really great year.

XO
ZoomInfo

28, I like you already.

We spent this last weekend in Seattle visiting family and celebrating my birthday and it was beyond lovely, despite the rain.

Nick’s brother + wife moved up there last fall, and we’d been looking for any excuse to go up there and drink beer with them (if I’m being completely honest). Last summer’s weekend in Seattle was insanely magical (the sunshine helped) so we were eager to re-visit some of our favorite spots with some of our favorite people.

Well, turns out it’s June. And June in the Pacific Northwest is entirely hit or miss when it comes to weather. It’s been warm and sunny both in Portland and Seattle recently, but like clockwork Friday came around and so did the rain. And it just kind of lingered all weekend long. 

Did it stop us? Definitely not- we’re Portland people. If rain stopped us we’d be seriously screwed.

We arrived late morning on Saturday and headed to Ballard to grab lunch (also picked up some amazing new flats), followed by chocolate and beer in Fremont, Gasworks Park, + birthday dinner Downtown.

Sunday was filled with Vodka/Gin tasting, a brief walk through the market, Mac + Cheese at Beecher’s, Moorea Seal’s brick + mortar, and finally Essex + Delancey for drinks/dinner.

And I saved the best for last. Monday was forecasted to be the nicest of the three days, so we held out on making the trip to Greenlake until then. I posted a bit about Greenlake last summer (charming man-made lake in Seattle, no motorized boats allowed), but it’s most certainly one of my favorite places on earth. By 11am on Monday, it was still cold and rainy but we needed to head back to Portland soonish so we made the quick trip to the lake. We wandered around for a bit, but decided it was just too cold out. We made a pact to visit later in the summer when it was sure to be sunny. Nick stopped to use the bathroom on the way back to the car, and in those few minutes the sun broke. And suddenly there was blue sky, and it was what felt like 15 degrees warmer. Magic, right? So we stayed a while and soaked it up.

It was a perfect way to welcome 28. I have a feeling it’s going to be a really, really great year.

XO

It might be Tuesday for you, but it’s definitely my Monday.
At the moment I’m a bit “hungover” from a crazy 3-day weekend filled with kitchen painting, wine, a ridiculous abundance of sunshine (for June in Oregon), the saddest movie ever, and this UH-MAZING sandwich.
This was an attempt to replicate a sandwich we sometimes pick up from local shop Foster & Dobbes, which simply has whole grain mustard, a triple creme brie and bread + butter pickles. 
Since we recently pickled some red onions, we subbed those for the pickles and added a bit of butter lettuce. We were lucky enough to talk to a really knowledgable guy behind the cheese counter at Pastaworks and he told us about some perfectly ripe single creme brie from France that was pretty unbelievable but any creamy cheese would do!
You’ll need:
A small baguette (we shared one)
Whole grain mustard
Whatever type of brie strikes your fancy- 1/4 lb was the perfect amount for us
Pickled onions OR bread + butter pickles
Butter lettuce
Here’s to a short work week filled with more painting, more wine, more sunshine and MY BIRTHDAY (eve).
xo
ZoomInfo
It might be Tuesday for you, but it’s definitely my Monday.
At the moment I’m a bit “hungover” from a crazy 3-day weekend filled with kitchen painting, wine, a ridiculous abundance of sunshine (for June in Oregon), the saddest movie ever, and this UH-MAZING sandwich.
This was an attempt to replicate a sandwich we sometimes pick up from local shop Foster & Dobbes, which simply has whole grain mustard, a triple creme brie and bread + butter pickles. 
Since we recently pickled some red onions, we subbed those for the pickles and added a bit of butter lettuce. We were lucky enough to talk to a really knowledgable guy behind the cheese counter at Pastaworks and he told us about some perfectly ripe single creme brie from France that was pretty unbelievable but any creamy cheese would do!
You’ll need:
A small baguette (we shared one)
Whole grain mustard
Whatever type of brie strikes your fancy- 1/4 lb was the perfect amount for us
Pickled onions OR bread + butter pickles
Butter lettuce
Here’s to a short work week filled with more painting, more wine, more sunshine and MY BIRTHDAY (eve).
xo
ZoomInfo
It might be Tuesday for you, but it’s definitely my Monday.
At the moment I’m a bit “hungover” from a crazy 3-day weekend filled with kitchen painting, wine, a ridiculous abundance of sunshine (for June in Oregon), the saddest movie ever, and this UH-MAZING sandwich.
This was an attempt to replicate a sandwich we sometimes pick up from local shop Foster & Dobbes, which simply has whole grain mustard, a triple creme brie and bread + butter pickles. 
Since we recently pickled some red onions, we subbed those for the pickles and added a bit of butter lettuce. We were lucky enough to talk to a really knowledgable guy behind the cheese counter at Pastaworks and he told us about some perfectly ripe single creme brie from France that was pretty unbelievable but any creamy cheese would do!
You’ll need:
A small baguette (we shared one)
Whole grain mustard
Whatever type of brie strikes your fancy- 1/4 lb was the perfect amount for us
Pickled onions OR bread + butter pickles
Butter lettuce
Here’s to a short work week filled with more painting, more wine, more sunshine and MY BIRTHDAY (eve).
xo
ZoomInfo
It might be Tuesday for you, but it’s definitely my Monday.
At the moment I’m a bit “hungover” from a crazy 3-day weekend filled with kitchen painting, wine, a ridiculous abundance of sunshine (for June in Oregon), the saddest movie ever, and this UH-MAZING sandwich.
This was an attempt to replicate a sandwich we sometimes pick up from local shop Foster & Dobbes, which simply has whole grain mustard, a triple creme brie and bread + butter pickles. 
Since we recently pickled some red onions, we subbed those for the pickles and added a bit of butter lettuce. We were lucky enough to talk to a really knowledgable guy behind the cheese counter at Pastaworks and he told us about some perfectly ripe single creme brie from France that was pretty unbelievable but any creamy cheese would do!
You’ll need:
A small baguette (we shared one)
Whole grain mustard
Whatever type of brie strikes your fancy- 1/4 lb was the perfect amount for us
Pickled onions OR bread + butter pickles
Butter lettuce
Here’s to a short work week filled with more painting, more wine, more sunshine and MY BIRTHDAY (eve).
xo
ZoomInfo
It might be Tuesday for you, but it’s definitely my Monday.
At the moment I’m a bit “hungover” from a crazy 3-day weekend filled with kitchen painting, wine, a ridiculous abundance of sunshine (for June in Oregon), the saddest movie ever, and this UH-MAZING sandwich.
This was an attempt to replicate a sandwich we sometimes pick up from local shop Foster & Dobbes, which simply has whole grain mustard, a triple creme brie and bread + butter pickles. 
Since we recently pickled some red onions, we subbed those for the pickles and added a bit of butter lettuce. We were lucky enough to talk to a really knowledgable guy behind the cheese counter at Pastaworks and he told us about some perfectly ripe single creme brie from France that was pretty unbelievable but any creamy cheese would do!
You’ll need:
A small baguette (we shared one)
Whole grain mustard
Whatever type of brie strikes your fancy- 1/4 lb was the perfect amount for us
Pickled onions OR bread + butter pickles
Butter lettuce
Here’s to a short work week filled with more painting, more wine, more sunshine and MY BIRTHDAY (eve).
xo
ZoomInfo
It might be Tuesday for you, but it’s definitely my Monday.
At the moment I’m a bit “hungover” from a crazy 3-day weekend filled with kitchen painting, wine, a ridiculous abundance of sunshine (for June in Oregon), the saddest movie ever, and this UH-MAZING sandwich.
This was an attempt to replicate a sandwich we sometimes pick up from local shop Foster & Dobbes, which simply has whole grain mustard, a triple creme brie and bread + butter pickles. 
Since we recently pickled some red onions, we subbed those for the pickles and added a bit of butter lettuce. We were lucky enough to talk to a really knowledgable guy behind the cheese counter at Pastaworks and he told us about some perfectly ripe single creme brie from France that was pretty unbelievable but any creamy cheese would do!
You’ll need:
A small baguette (we shared one)
Whole grain mustard
Whatever type of brie strikes your fancy- 1/4 lb was the perfect amount for us
Pickled onions OR bread + butter pickles
Butter lettuce
Here’s to a short work week filled with more painting, more wine, more sunshine and MY BIRTHDAY (eve).
xo
ZoomInfo
It might be Tuesday for you, but it’s definitely my Monday.
At the moment I’m a bit “hungover” from a crazy 3-day weekend filled with kitchen painting, wine, a ridiculous abundance of sunshine (for June in Oregon), the saddest movie ever, and this UH-MAZING sandwich.
This was an attempt to replicate a sandwich we sometimes pick up from local shop Foster & Dobbes, which simply has whole grain mustard, a triple creme brie and bread + butter pickles. 
Since we recently pickled some red onions, we subbed those for the pickles and added a bit of butter lettuce. We were lucky enough to talk to a really knowledgable guy behind the cheese counter at Pastaworks and he told us about some perfectly ripe single creme brie from France that was pretty unbelievable but any creamy cheese would do!
You’ll need:
A small baguette (we shared one)
Whole grain mustard
Whatever type of brie strikes your fancy- 1/4 lb was the perfect amount for us
Pickled onions OR bread + butter pickles
Butter lettuce
Here’s to a short work week filled with more painting, more wine, more sunshine and MY BIRTHDAY (eve).
xo
ZoomInfo

It might be Tuesday for you, but it’s definitely my Monday.

At the moment I’m a bit “hungover” from a crazy 3-day weekend filled with kitchen painting, wine, a ridiculous abundance of sunshine (for June in Oregon), the saddest movie ever, and this UH-MAZING sandwich.

This was an attempt to replicate a sandwich we sometimes pick up from local shop Foster & Dobbes, which simply has whole grain mustard, a triple creme brie and bread + butter pickles. 

Since we recently pickled some red onions, we subbed those for the pickles and added a bit of butter lettuce. We were lucky enough to talk to a really knowledgable guy behind the cheese counter at Pastaworks and he told us about some perfectly ripe single creme brie from France that was pretty unbelievable but any creamy cheese would do!

You’ll need:

  • A small baguette (we shared one)
  • Whole grain mustard
  • Whatever type of brie strikes your fancy- 1/4 lb was the perfect amount for us
  • Pickled onions OR bread + butter pickles
  • Butter lettuce

Here’s to a short work week filled with more painting, more wine, more sunshine and MY BIRTHDAY (eve).

xo

Today is my 100th post! Can you believe it? It’s been a little under a year since my first post, and I really can’t fathom that I’ve somehow managed (in between work + printing + life) to post 100 of these. One Hundred. I’ve learned a ridiculous amount about myself, and what this whole blogging thing is about and I hope I’ve shared a thing or two that have helped you in one way or another.
And in celebration…
100 things I’ve learned about life from blogging:
1. try to keep your camera with you. not the phone one, that’s pretty much worthless.
2. sometimes you spend hours working on a blog post that 6 people read.
3. don’t make things more complicated than they need to be.
4. comparison is the thief of joy.
5. never stop adding ideas to the running list you keep in your phone, good or bad. they’ll save you.
6. when in doubt, take a break.
7. it’s better to have a few faithful readers/friends than many shallow ones.
8. sometimes at 11pm, it’s good enough.
9. there’s nothing quite as difficult as producing something creative (and good) on command.
10. having to capture your life for others makes you acutely aware of everything you take for granted.
11. there’s something quite satisfying about emptying your mind to a bunch of strangers.
12. you are good enough.
13. there are days when it isn’t fun AND it doesn’t pay. suck it up.
14. get organized.
15. social media is still in it’s infancy and rules are still being defined and people are still figuring out whether they want to be privy your dirty laundry or not.
16. pinterest is more valuable than you realize.
17. writing about your day to day life on the internet is vulnerable as hell.
18. planning ahead (ie. brainstorming, taking photos) makes life so much less stressful.
19. but with that being said, sometimes it’s those moments when you’re scrambling for ANYTHING to post about that you find something truly magical and unexpected.
20. life is a constant battle between wanting to improve yourself and wanting to love yourself exactly as you are. we’re all in that boat together.
21. sometimes playing outside in the sunshine is more important.
22. ask for help when you need it.
23. be gentle with yourself. chances are nobody thinks as critically about you as you do.
24. it’s more important to get out of the house and actually live life than it is to blog about it.
25. success is liking who you are and what you create.
26. be kind. speak kindly. write kindly. live kindly.
27. it’s okay if you don’t care what other’s think (more power to you!), and equally okay if you do.
28. the mundane can become extraordinary with well taken photos.
29. telling your own story is healing.
30. without fail, you will never be able to predict which posts will be popular. don’t even try.
32. sometimes failure is a necessary part of the creative process. 
29. the simple pleasure of good food/drink is universal.
30. compliments are nice, but don’t expect them.
31. some people you know are going to worry about your presence on the internet, those people mean well.
32. don’t try to figure out everything all at once.
33. focus on what matters to YOU. you’ll attract the right people, and they’ll stay loyal.
34. be as you wish to seem.
35. deadlines help get things done. 
36. try not to complain about what you do. YOU have chosen this, and choose to continue to do this every week.
37. making stuff with your hands will make you more grounded, more skilled and frankly, more happy.
38. you are more creative/smart/interesting than you realize.
39. being an introvert serves you well as a thinker and a writer. embrace it.
40. be daring.
41. be unapologetically yourself, people really dig that.
42. sometimes you don’t realize what you feel until you begin to string the sentences together.
43. be brave enough to start a conversation that matters.
44. it will always be a shock (the best kind) when you run into a random acquaintance and they mention a specific blog post of yours.
45. turn off the internet every once in a while.
46. optimism just feels better.
47. your unique way of seeing things and approach to life can be valuable and inspiring to people you don’t know.
48. fake it ‘til you make it.
49. you know the truth by the way it feels when you write it down.
50. perfection is annihilation.
51. Seasons in the Pacific Northwest are not created equally as far as photography is concerned. Starting a blog in summer leads to a major letdown.
52. don’t covet your ideas, share them freely and openly.
53. blogging leads to research which leads to learning A LOT. Soak it up.
54. it’s okay to follow trends.
55. you should always be able to back up your claims. 
56. sunday, tuesday + thursday seems like everyday. two posts a week is much more humane, especially in the winter.
57. come up with a simple format for posting photos and text, and stick with it.
58. being happy is more important than being productive.
59. don’t compare yourself to anybody, but especially not anna rifle bond of rifle paper. you’ll want to cry.
60. embrace the messy, the unfinished, the imperfect.
61. allow your vision to change along the way.
62. create + write as if you are the only audience.
63. don’t shush your inner voice, but try not to let your inner critic paralyze you. she’s kind of a bitch.
64. if you share the things that make you happy, it will be contagious.
65. writing first thing in the morning and last thing at night keep your mind more alert and aware than they would otherwise be.
66. so what if a million (slight exaggeration probably) other bloggers have posted about oil pulling? do it in your own original voice and people will be interested.
67. save your work. save. your. work.
68. not everyone will appreciate what you put out there, but the people who do will be pretty wonderful.
69. make time for play.
70. don’t let the opinions of others consume you, good or bad.
71. finding the perfect quote is like finding a needle in a haystack. patience is mandatory.
72. don’t be offended if people you are close with haven’t read your blog in a while. everyone is busy with their own lives and there’s no sense in taking that personally.
73. it helps if you get genuinely excited about things.
74. it’s often hard to get inspired sitting at home, get out and play!
75. do not believe all of the things you tell yourself late at night.
76. cocktail posts always win.
77. it’s okay to start over.
78. having a super talented, crafty husband is definitely a blog asset.
79. building up a readership takes time, and A LOT of social media savvy.
80. the things that made you awkward and weird as a kid will make you a good blogger.
81. when in doubt, post pictures of fleur. people are crazy about french bulldogs.
82. blogging is like a time capsule that you’ll be able to refer back to forever (we all know nothing on the internet ever dies). be smart about what you write, but also honest.
83. it’s vital to celebrate and reward yourself for the work you do; sometimes you are the only one who will.
84. connect with people who do what you do and collaborate if possible.
85. create a space and routine that encourage focus and inspiration.
86. listen to your friends when they mention off-hand things they’d like you to blog about, they’re likely speaking for a larger demographic.
87. have a plan b, and c, and d, if possible.
88. explore your amazing city every chance you get.
89. there’s nothing wrong with your mom being your most loyal reader.
90. execute boring ideas beautifully.
91. networking is a thing you should probably get better at.
92. there is no limit to how many things around the house you can diy if you put your mind (and muscles) to it.
93. don’t second guess your instincts.
94. sleep is more important.
95. inspiration is often right under your nose.
96. creativity ebbs and flows; don’t get discouraged.
97. preach what you believe in with conviction, but do it gently. 
98. if nothing else, blogging for the last year has been an incredible lesson in proving to yourself (and the poor friends and family that were subjected to your brief former blogs) that you can stick with something for a decent amount of time.
99. it matters.
100. 100 of anything is ridiculous (i learned this just now). 
Did you make it all the way down here? 
I hope so, because this is the part where I thank YOU for stopping by here and sharing in this crazy thing with me.
You’re simply the best.
xo
- lovely illustrated numbers found here -
ZoomInfo
Today is my 100th post! Can you believe it? It’s been a little under a year since my first post, and I really can’t fathom that I’ve somehow managed (in between work + printing + life) to post 100 of these. One Hundred. I’ve learned a ridiculous amount about myself, and what this whole blogging thing is about and I hope I’ve shared a thing or two that have helped you in one way or another.
And in celebration…
100 things I’ve learned about life from blogging:
1. try to keep your camera with you. not the phone one, that’s pretty much worthless.
2. sometimes you spend hours working on a blog post that 6 people read.
3. don’t make things more complicated than they need to be.
4. comparison is the thief of joy.
5. never stop adding ideas to the running list you keep in your phone, good or bad. they’ll save you.
6. when in doubt, take a break.
7. it’s better to have a few faithful readers/friends than many shallow ones.
8. sometimes at 11pm, it’s good enough.
9. there’s nothing quite as difficult as producing something creative (and good) on command.
10. having to capture your life for others makes you acutely aware of everything you take for granted.
11. there’s something quite satisfying about emptying your mind to a bunch of strangers.
12. you are good enough.
13. there are days when it isn’t fun AND it doesn’t pay. suck it up.
14. get organized.
15. social media is still in it’s infancy and rules are still being defined and people are still figuring out whether they want to be privy your dirty laundry or not.
16. pinterest is more valuable than you realize.
17. writing about your day to day life on the internet is vulnerable as hell.
18. planning ahead (ie. brainstorming, taking photos) makes life so much less stressful.
19. but with that being said, sometimes it’s those moments when you’re scrambling for ANYTHING to post about that you find something truly magical and unexpected.
20. life is a constant battle between wanting to improve yourself and wanting to love yourself exactly as you are. we’re all in that boat together.
21. sometimes playing outside in the sunshine is more important.
22. ask for help when you need it.
23. be gentle with yourself. chances are nobody thinks as critically about you as you do.
24. it’s more important to get out of the house and actually live life than it is to blog about it.
25. success is liking who you are and what you create.
26. be kind. speak kindly. write kindly. live kindly.
27. it’s okay if you don’t care what other’s think (more power to you!), and equally okay if you do.
28. the mundane can become extraordinary with well taken photos.
29. telling your own story is healing.
30. without fail, you will never be able to predict which posts will be popular. don’t even try.
32. sometimes failure is a necessary part of the creative process. 
29. the simple pleasure of good food/drink is universal.
30. compliments are nice, but don’t expect them.
31. some people you know are going to worry about your presence on the internet, those people mean well.
32. don’t try to figure out everything all at once.
33. focus on what matters to YOU. you’ll attract the right people, and they’ll stay loyal.
34. be as you wish to seem.
35. deadlines help get things done. 
36. try not to complain about what you do. YOU have chosen this, and choose to continue to do this every week.
37. making stuff with your hands will make you more grounded, more skilled and frankly, more happy.
38. you are more creative/smart/interesting than you realize.
39. being an introvert serves you well as a thinker and a writer. embrace it.
40. be daring.
41. be unapologetically yourself, people really dig that.
42. sometimes you don’t realize what you feel until you begin to string the sentences together.
43. be brave enough to start a conversation that matters.
44. it will always be a shock (the best kind) when you run into a random acquaintance and they mention a specific blog post of yours.
45. turn off the internet every once in a while.
46. optimism just feels better.
47. your unique way of seeing things and approach to life can be valuable and inspiring to people you don’t know.
48. fake it ‘til you make it.
49. you know the truth by the way it feels when you write it down.
50. perfection is annihilation.
51. Seasons in the Pacific Northwest are not created equally as far as photography is concerned. Starting a blog in summer leads to a major letdown.
52. don’t covet your ideas, share them freely and openly.
53. blogging leads to research which leads to learning A LOT. Soak it up.
54. it’s okay to follow trends.
55. you should always be able to back up your claims. 
56. sunday, tuesday + thursday seems like everyday. two posts a week is much more humane, especially in the winter.
57. come up with a simple format for posting photos and text, and stick with it.
58. being happy is more important than being productive.
59. don’t compare yourself to anybody, but especially not anna rifle bond of rifle paper. you’ll want to cry.
60. embrace the messy, the unfinished, the imperfect.
61. allow your vision to change along the way.
62. create + write as if you are the only audience.
63. don’t shush your inner voice, but try not to let your inner critic paralyze you. she’s kind of a bitch.
64. if you share the things that make you happy, it will be contagious.
65. writing first thing in the morning and last thing at night keep your mind more alert and aware than they would otherwise be.
66. so what if a million (slight exaggeration probably) other bloggers have posted about oil pulling? do it in your own original voice and people will be interested.
67. save your work. save. your. work.
68. not everyone will appreciate what you put out there, but the people who do will be pretty wonderful.
69. make time for play.
70. don’t let the opinions of others consume you, good or bad.
71. finding the perfect quote is like finding a needle in a haystack. patience is mandatory.
72. don’t be offended if people you are close with haven’t read your blog in a while. everyone is busy with their own lives and there’s no sense in taking that personally.
73. it helps if you get genuinely excited about things.
74. it’s often hard to get inspired sitting at home, get out and play!
75. do not believe all of the things you tell yourself late at night.
76. cocktail posts always win.
77. it’s okay to start over.
78. having a super talented, crafty husband is definitely a blog asset.
79. building up a readership takes time, and A LOT of social media savvy.
80. the things that made you awkward and weird as a kid will make you a good blogger.
81. when in doubt, post pictures of fleur. people are crazy about french bulldogs.
82. blogging is like a time capsule that you’ll be able to refer back to forever (we all know nothing on the internet ever dies). be smart about what you write, but also honest.
83. it’s vital to celebrate and reward yourself for the work you do; sometimes you are the only one who will.
84. connect with people who do what you do and collaborate if possible.
85. create a space and routine that encourage focus and inspiration.
86. listen to your friends when they mention off-hand things they’d like you to blog about, they’re likely speaking for a larger demographic.
87. have a plan b, and c, and d, if possible.
88. explore your amazing city every chance you get.
89. there’s nothing wrong with your mom being your most loyal reader.
90. execute boring ideas beautifully.
91. networking is a thing you should probably get better at.
92. there is no limit to how many things around the house you can diy if you put your mind (and muscles) to it.
93. don’t second guess your instincts.
94. sleep is more important.
95. inspiration is often right under your nose.
96. creativity ebbs and flows; don’t get discouraged.
97. preach what you believe in with conviction, but do it gently. 
98. if nothing else, blogging for the last year has been an incredible lesson in proving to yourself (and the poor friends and family that were subjected to your brief former blogs) that you can stick with something for a decent amount of time.
99. it matters.
100. 100 of anything is ridiculous (i learned this just now). 
Did you make it all the way down here? 
I hope so, because this is the part where I thank YOU for stopping by here and sharing in this crazy thing with me.
You’re simply the best.
xo
- lovely illustrated numbers found here -
ZoomInfo
Today is my 100th post! Can you believe it? It’s been a little under a year since my first post, and I really can’t fathom that I’ve somehow managed (in between work + printing + life) to post 100 of these. One Hundred. I’ve learned a ridiculous amount about myself, and what this whole blogging thing is about and I hope I’ve shared a thing or two that have helped you in one way or another.
And in celebration…
100 things I’ve learned about life from blogging:
1. try to keep your camera with you. not the phone one, that’s pretty much worthless.
2. sometimes you spend hours working on a blog post that 6 people read.
3. don’t make things more complicated than they need to be.
4. comparison is the thief of joy.
5. never stop adding ideas to the running list you keep in your phone, good or bad. they’ll save you.
6. when in doubt, take a break.
7. it’s better to have a few faithful readers/friends than many shallow ones.
8. sometimes at 11pm, it’s good enough.
9. there’s nothing quite as difficult as producing something creative (and good) on command.
10. having to capture your life for others makes you acutely aware of everything you take for granted.
11. there’s something quite satisfying about emptying your mind to a bunch of strangers.
12. you are good enough.
13. there are days when it isn’t fun AND it doesn’t pay. suck it up.
14. get organized.
15. social media is still in it’s infancy and rules are still being defined and people are still figuring out whether they want to be privy your dirty laundry or not.
16. pinterest is more valuable than you realize.
17. writing about your day to day life on the internet is vulnerable as hell.
18. planning ahead (ie. brainstorming, taking photos) makes life so much less stressful.
19. but with that being said, sometimes it’s those moments when you’re scrambling for ANYTHING to post about that you find something truly magical and unexpected.
20. life is a constant battle between wanting to improve yourself and wanting to love yourself exactly as you are. we’re all in that boat together.
21. sometimes playing outside in the sunshine is more important.
22. ask for help when you need it.
23. be gentle with yourself. chances are nobody thinks as critically about you as you do.
24. it’s more important to get out of the house and actually live life than it is to blog about it.
25. success is liking who you are and what you create.
26. be kind. speak kindly. write kindly. live kindly.
27. it’s okay if you don’t care what other’s think (more power to you!), and equally okay if you do.
28. the mundane can become extraordinary with well taken photos.
29. telling your own story is healing.
30. without fail, you will never be able to predict which posts will be popular. don’t even try.
32. sometimes failure is a necessary part of the creative process. 
29. the simple pleasure of good food/drink is universal.
30. compliments are nice, but don’t expect them.
31. some people you know are going to worry about your presence on the internet, those people mean well.
32. don’t try to figure out everything all at once.
33. focus on what matters to YOU. you’ll attract the right people, and they’ll stay loyal.
34. be as you wish to seem.
35. deadlines help get things done. 
36. try not to complain about what you do. YOU have chosen this, and choose to continue to do this every week.
37. making stuff with your hands will make you more grounded, more skilled and frankly, more happy.
38. you are more creative/smart/interesting than you realize.
39. being an introvert serves you well as a thinker and a writer. embrace it.
40. be daring.
41. be unapologetically yourself, people really dig that.
42. sometimes you don’t realize what you feel until you begin to string the sentences together.
43. be brave enough to start a conversation that matters.
44. it will always be a shock (the best kind) when you run into a random acquaintance and they mention a specific blog post of yours.
45. turn off the internet every once in a while.
46. optimism just feels better.
47. your unique way of seeing things and approach to life can be valuable and inspiring to people you don’t know.
48. fake it ‘til you make it.
49. you know the truth by the way it feels when you write it down.
50. perfection is annihilation.
51. Seasons in the Pacific Northwest are not created equally as far as photography is concerned. Starting a blog in summer leads to a major letdown.
52. don’t covet your ideas, share them freely and openly.
53. blogging leads to research which leads to learning A LOT. Soak it up.
54. it’s okay to follow trends.
55. you should always be able to back up your claims. 
56. sunday, tuesday + thursday seems like everyday. two posts a week is much more humane, especially in the winter.
57. come up with a simple format for posting photos and text, and stick with it.
58. being happy is more important than being productive.
59. don’t compare yourself to anybody, but especially not anna rifle bond of rifle paper. you’ll want to cry.
60. embrace the messy, the unfinished, the imperfect.
61. allow your vision to change along the way.
62. create + write as if you are the only audience.
63. don’t shush your inner voice, but try not to let your inner critic paralyze you. she’s kind of a bitch.
64. if you share the things that make you happy, it will be contagious.
65. writing first thing in the morning and last thing at night keep your mind more alert and aware than they would otherwise be.
66. so what if a million (slight exaggeration probably) other bloggers have posted about oil pulling? do it in your own original voice and people will be interested.
67. save your work. save. your. work.
68. not everyone will appreciate what you put out there, but the people who do will be pretty wonderful.
69. make time for play.
70. don’t let the opinions of others consume you, good or bad.
71. finding the perfect quote is like finding a needle in a haystack. patience is mandatory.
72. don’t be offended if people you are close with haven’t read your blog in a while. everyone is busy with their own lives and there’s no sense in taking that personally.
73. it helps if you get genuinely excited about things.
74. it’s often hard to get inspired sitting at home, get out and play!
75. do not believe all of the things you tell yourself late at night.
76. cocktail posts always win.
77. it’s okay to start over.
78. having a super talented, crafty husband is definitely a blog asset.
79. building up a readership takes time, and A LOT of social media savvy.
80. the things that made you awkward and weird as a kid will make you a good blogger.
81. when in doubt, post pictures of fleur. people are crazy about french bulldogs.
82. blogging is like a time capsule that you’ll be able to refer back to forever (we all know nothing on the internet ever dies). be smart about what you write, but also honest.
83. it’s vital to celebrate and reward yourself for the work you do; sometimes you are the only one who will.
84. connect with people who do what you do and collaborate if possible.
85. create a space and routine that encourage focus and inspiration.
86. listen to your friends when they mention off-hand things they’d like you to blog about, they’re likely speaking for a larger demographic.
87. have a plan b, and c, and d, if possible.
88. explore your amazing city every chance you get.
89. there’s nothing wrong with your mom being your most loyal reader.
90. execute boring ideas beautifully.
91. networking is a thing you should probably get better at.
92. there is no limit to how many things around the house you can diy if you put your mind (and muscles) to it.
93. don’t second guess your instincts.
94. sleep is more important.
95. inspiration is often right under your nose.
96. creativity ebbs and flows; don’t get discouraged.
97. preach what you believe in with conviction, but do it gently. 
98. if nothing else, blogging for the last year has been an incredible lesson in proving to yourself (and the poor friends and family that were subjected to your brief former blogs) that you can stick with something for a decent amount of time.
99. it matters.
100. 100 of anything is ridiculous (i learned this just now). 
Did you make it all the way down here? 
I hope so, because this is the part where I thank YOU for stopping by here and sharing in this crazy thing with me.
You’re simply the best.
xo
- lovely illustrated numbers found here -
ZoomInfo

Today is my 100th post! Can you believe it? It’s been a little under a year since my first post, and I really can’t fathom that I’ve somehow managed (in between work + printing + life) to post 100 of these. One Hundred. I’ve learned a ridiculous amount about myself, and what this whole blogging thing is about and I hope I’ve shared a thing or two that have helped you in one way or another.

And in celebration…

100 things I’ve learned about life from blogging:

1. try to keep your camera with you. not the phone one, that’s pretty much worthless.

2. sometimes you spend hours working on a blog post that 6 people read.

3. don’t make things more complicated than they need to be.

4. comparison is the thief of joy.

5. never stop adding ideas to the running list you keep in your phone, good or bad. they’ll save you.

6. when in doubt, take a break.

7. it’s better to have a few faithful readers/friends than many shallow ones.

8. sometimes at 11pm, it’s good enough.

9. there’s nothing quite as difficult as producing something creative (and good) on command.

10. having to capture your life for others makes you acutely aware of everything you take for granted.

11. there’s something quite satisfying about emptying your mind to a bunch of strangers.

12. you are good enough.

13. there are days when it isn’t fun AND it doesn’t pay. suck it up.

14. get organized.

15. social media is still in it’s infancy and rules are still being defined and people are still figuring out whether they want to be privy your dirty laundry or not.

16. pinterest is more valuable than you realize.

17. writing about your day to day life on the internet is vulnerable as hell.

18. planning ahead (ie. brainstorming, taking photos) makes life so much less stressful.

19. but with that being said, sometimes it’s those moments when you’re scrambling for ANYTHING to post about that you find something truly magical and unexpected.

20. life is a constant battle between wanting to improve yourself and wanting to love yourself exactly as you are. we’re all in that boat together.

21. sometimes playing outside in the sunshine is more important.

22. ask for help when you need it.

23. be gentle with yourself. chances are nobody thinks as critically about you as you do.

24. it’s more important to get out of the house and actually live life than it is to blog about it.

25. success is liking who you are and what you create.

26. be kind. speak kindly. write kindly. live kindly.

27. it’s okay if you don’t care what other’s think (more power to you!), and equally okay if you do.

28. the mundane can become extraordinary with well taken photos.

29. telling your own story is healing.

30. without fail, you will never be able to predict which posts will be popular. don’t even try.

32. sometimes failure is a necessary part of the creative process. 

29. the simple pleasure of good food/drink is universal.

30. compliments are nice, but don’t expect them.

31. some people you know are going to worry about your presence on the internet, those people mean well.

32. don’t try to figure out everything all at once.

33. focus on what matters to YOU. you’ll attract the right people, and they’ll stay loyal.

34. be as you wish to seem.

35. deadlines help get things done. 

36. try not to complain about what you do. YOU have chosen this, and choose to continue to do this every week.

37. making stuff with your hands will make you more grounded, more skilled and frankly, more happy.

38. you are more creative/smart/interesting than you realize.

39. being an introvert serves you well as a thinker and a writer. embrace it.

40. be daring.

41. be unapologetically yourself, people really dig that.

42. sometimes you don’t realize what you feel until you begin to string the sentences together.

43. be brave enough to start a conversation that matters.

44. it will always be a shock (the best kind) when you run into a random acquaintance and they mention a specific blog post of yours.

45. turn off the internet every once in a while.

46. optimism just feels better.

47. your unique way of seeing things and approach to life can be valuable and inspiring to people you don’t know.

48. fake it ‘til you make it.

49. you know the truth by the way it feels when you write it down.

50. perfection is annihilation.

51. Seasons in the Pacific Northwest are not created equally as far as photography is concerned. Starting a blog in summer leads to a major letdown.

52. don’t covet your ideas, share them freely and openly.

53. blogging leads to research which leads to learning A LOT. Soak it up.

54. it’s okay to follow trends.

55. you should always be able to back up your claims. 

56. sunday, tuesday + thursday seems like everyday. two posts a week is much more humane, especially in the winter.

57. come up with a simple format for posting photos and text, and stick with it.

58. being happy is more important than being productive.

59. don’t compare yourself to anybody, but especially not anna rifle bond of rifle paper. you’ll want to cry.

60. embrace the messy, the unfinished, the imperfect.

61. allow your vision to change along the way.

62. create + write as if you are the only audience.

63. don’t shush your inner voice, but try not to let your inner critic paralyze you. she’s kind of a bitch.

64. if you share the things that make you happy, it will be contagious.

65. writing first thing in the morning and last thing at night keep your mind more alert and aware than they would otherwise be.

66. so what if a million (slight exaggeration probably) other bloggers have posted about oil pulling? do it in your own original voice and people will be interested.

67. save your work. save. your. work.

68. not everyone will appreciate what you put out there, but the people who do will be pretty wonderful.

69. make time for play.

70. don’t let the opinions of others consume you, good or bad.

71. finding the perfect quote is like finding a needle in a haystack. patience is mandatory.

72. don’t be offended if people you are close with haven’t read your blog in a while. everyone is busy with their own lives and there’s no sense in taking that personally.

73. it helps if you get genuinely excited about things.

74. it’s often hard to get inspired sitting at home, get out and play!

75. do not believe all of the things you tell yourself late at night.

76. cocktail posts always win.

77. it’s okay to start over.

78. having a super talented, crafty husband is definitely a blog asset.

79. building up a readership takes time, and A LOT of social media savvy.

80. the things that made you awkward and weird as a kid will make you a good blogger.

81. when in doubt, post pictures of fleur. people are crazy about french bulldogs.

82. blogging is like a time capsule that you’ll be able to refer back to forever (we all know nothing on the internet ever dies). be smart about what you write, but also honest.

83. it’s vital to celebrate and reward yourself for the work you do; sometimes you are the only one who will.

84. connect with people who do what you do and collaborate if possible.

85. create a space and routine that encourage focus and inspiration.

86. listen to your friends when they mention off-hand things they’d like you to blog about, they’re likely speaking for a larger demographic.

87. have a plan b, and c, and d, if possible.

88. explore your amazing city every chance you get.

89. there’s nothing wrong with your mom being your most loyal reader.

90. execute boring ideas beautifully.

91. networking is a thing you should probably get better at.

92. there is no limit to how many things around the house you can diy if you put your mind (and muscles) to it.

93. don’t second guess your instincts.

94. sleep is more important.

95. inspiration is often right under your nose.

96. creativity ebbs and flows; don’t get discouraged.

97. preach what you believe in with conviction, but do it gently. 

98. if nothing else, blogging for the last year has been an incredible lesson in proving to yourself (and the poor friends and family that were subjected to your brief former blogs) that you can stick with something for a decent amount of time.

99. it matters.

100. 100 of anything is ridiculous (i learned this just now). 

Did you make it all the way down here? 

I hope so, because this is the part where I thank YOU for stopping by here and sharing in this crazy thing with me.

You’re simply the best.

xo

- lovely illustrated numbers found here -

After a gloriously sunny weekend filled with bike riding, farmer’s marketing, picnicing, and gardening, starting the work week didn’t seem so bad. Especially, since the sun stuck around.
We both had yesterday afternoon off, so we grabbed our new favorite lunch (thai green papaya salad), ran a few errands, and took on a project that needed to happen about 2 years ago; we cleaned all of our windows inside and out.
The difference it made is insane, especially since our old home has so many big windows and we were thoroughly exhausted by the time we were done. Remedy? A short little cat nap, followed by drinks and dinner on the porch. So tasty & restorative, and made me that much more excited about this whole “summer” thing.
On last night’s menu:
Fresh Nectarine Cocktail 
1 Nectarine
2oz Rum
3/4oz Lemon Juice
1 tsp Sugar
Soda Water
Garnish of Pineapple Sage from our yard
Blend up all of the ingredients except the soda water, and put through a strainer (we use a jelly bag). Add ice, and top with a splash of soda water.
_  _  _
Homemade Lupini Beans with Red Pepper Flake + Rosemary (will post on this perfect Italian drinking snack soon!)
_  _  _
BBQ Tofu - this is always something we wing based on what protein/other ingredients we have around the house
Skewered Firm Tofu
Nick’s Hot Sauce (essentially dried peppers + white vinegar blended)
Camelina Oil*
Lemon Juice
Garlic
_  _  _
Kale Salad with Nectarine, Peas from the garden + a Rhubarb Shrub Dressing (again, we just kind of throw these together with what we have on hand)
Rhubarb Shrub (you best believe we’ve hopped on the cocktail shrub bandwagon, and will be posting about it all summer long)
Camelina Oil*
Homemade whole grain mustard
Topped with a little bit of our homemade pickled onions (post soon!)
When we make salad dressing, we like to keep it simple. Be sure to include an oil, something with acidity, and something to emulsify. We throw everything into a mason jar, screw on the lid, and shake shake shake. 

Hopefully this serves as a jumping off point for making yourself a healthful, seasonal meal with what you have growing in your neck of the woods.

XO
*Camelina Oil has recently become available at our Farmer’s Market. It’s made up of about 35% (!) Omega 3’s, has an incredibly high smoking temp, and is grown locally! We also picked up some seeds, which are very similar to Chia and can be thrown in just about everything. Learn more here.
ZoomInfo
After a gloriously sunny weekend filled with bike riding, farmer’s marketing, picnicing, and gardening, starting the work week didn’t seem so bad. Especially, since the sun stuck around.
We both had yesterday afternoon off, so we grabbed our new favorite lunch (thai green papaya salad), ran a few errands, and took on a project that needed to happen about 2 years ago; we cleaned all of our windows inside and out.
The difference it made is insane, especially since our old home has so many big windows and we were thoroughly exhausted by the time we were done. Remedy? A short little cat nap, followed by drinks and dinner on the porch. So tasty & restorative, and made me that much more excited about this whole “summer” thing.
On last night’s menu:
Fresh Nectarine Cocktail 
1 Nectarine
2oz Rum
3/4oz Lemon Juice
1 tsp Sugar
Soda Water
Garnish of Pineapple Sage from our yard
Blend up all of the ingredients except the soda water, and put through a strainer (we use a jelly bag). Add ice, and top with a splash of soda water.
_  _  _
Homemade Lupini Beans with Red Pepper Flake + Rosemary (will post on this perfect Italian drinking snack soon!)
_  _  _
BBQ Tofu - this is always something we wing based on what protein/other ingredients we have around the house
Skewered Firm Tofu
Nick’s Hot Sauce (essentially dried peppers + white vinegar blended)
Camelina Oil*
Lemon Juice
Garlic
_  _  _
Kale Salad with Nectarine, Peas from the garden + a Rhubarb Shrub Dressing (again, we just kind of throw these together with what we have on hand)
Rhubarb Shrub (you best believe we’ve hopped on the cocktail shrub bandwagon, and will be posting about it all summer long)
Camelina Oil*
Homemade whole grain mustard
Topped with a little bit of our homemade pickled onions (post soon!)
When we make salad dressing, we like to keep it simple. Be sure to include an oil, something with acidity, and something to emulsify. We throw everything into a mason jar, screw on the lid, and shake shake shake. 

Hopefully this serves as a jumping off point for making yourself a healthful, seasonal meal with what you have growing in your neck of the woods.

XO
*Camelina Oil has recently become available at our Farmer’s Market. It’s made up of about 35% (!) Omega 3’s, has an incredibly high smoking temp, and is grown locally! We also picked up some seeds, which are very similar to Chia and can be thrown in just about everything. Learn more here.
ZoomInfo
After a gloriously sunny weekend filled with bike riding, farmer’s marketing, picnicing, and gardening, starting the work week didn’t seem so bad. Especially, since the sun stuck around.
We both had yesterday afternoon off, so we grabbed our new favorite lunch (thai green papaya salad), ran a few errands, and took on a project that needed to happen about 2 years ago; we cleaned all of our windows inside and out.
The difference it made is insane, especially since our old home has so many big windows and we were thoroughly exhausted by the time we were done. Remedy? A short little cat nap, followed by drinks and dinner on the porch. So tasty & restorative, and made me that much more excited about this whole “summer” thing.
On last night’s menu:
Fresh Nectarine Cocktail 
1 Nectarine
2oz Rum
3/4oz Lemon Juice
1 tsp Sugar
Soda Water
Garnish of Pineapple Sage from our yard
Blend up all of the ingredients except the soda water, and put through a strainer (we use a jelly bag). Add ice, and top with a splash of soda water.
_  _  _
Homemade Lupini Beans with Red Pepper Flake + Rosemary (will post on this perfect Italian drinking snack soon!)
_  _  _
BBQ Tofu - this is always something we wing based on what protein/other ingredients we have around the house
Skewered Firm Tofu
Nick’s Hot Sauce (essentially dried peppers + white vinegar blended)
Camelina Oil*
Lemon Juice
Garlic
_  _  _
Kale Salad with Nectarine, Peas from the garden + a Rhubarb Shrub Dressing (again, we just kind of throw these together with what we have on hand)
Rhubarb Shrub (you best believe we’ve hopped on the cocktail shrub bandwagon, and will be posting about it all summer long)
Camelina Oil*
Homemade whole grain mustard
Topped with a little bit of our homemade pickled onions (post soon!)
When we make salad dressing, we like to keep it simple. Be sure to include an oil, something with acidity, and something to emulsify. We throw everything into a mason jar, screw on the lid, and shake shake shake. 

Hopefully this serves as a jumping off point for making yourself a healthful, seasonal meal with what you have growing in your neck of the woods.

XO
*Camelina Oil has recently become available at our Farmer’s Market. It’s made up of about 35% (!) Omega 3’s, has an incredibly high smoking temp, and is grown locally! We also picked up some seeds, which are very similar to Chia and can be thrown in just about everything. Learn more here.
ZoomInfo
After a gloriously sunny weekend filled with bike riding, farmer’s marketing, picnicing, and gardening, starting the work week didn’t seem so bad. Especially, since the sun stuck around.
We both had yesterday afternoon off, so we grabbed our new favorite lunch (thai green papaya salad), ran a few errands, and took on a project that needed to happen about 2 years ago; we cleaned all of our windows inside and out.
The difference it made is insane, especially since our old home has so many big windows and we were thoroughly exhausted by the time we were done. Remedy? A short little cat nap, followed by drinks and dinner on the porch. So tasty & restorative, and made me that much more excited about this whole “summer” thing.
On last night’s menu:
Fresh Nectarine Cocktail 
1 Nectarine
2oz Rum
3/4oz Lemon Juice
1 tsp Sugar
Soda Water
Garnish of Pineapple Sage from our yard
Blend up all of the ingredients except the soda water, and put through a strainer (we use a jelly bag). Add ice, and top with a splash of soda water.
_  _  _
Homemade Lupini Beans with Red Pepper Flake + Rosemary (will post on this perfect Italian drinking snack soon!)
_  _  _
BBQ Tofu - this is always something we wing based on what protein/other ingredients we have around the house
Skewered Firm Tofu
Nick’s Hot Sauce (essentially dried peppers + white vinegar blended)
Camelina Oil*
Lemon Juice
Garlic
_  _  _
Kale Salad with Nectarine, Peas from the garden + a Rhubarb Shrub Dressing (again, we just kind of throw these together with what we have on hand)
Rhubarb Shrub (you best believe we’ve hopped on the cocktail shrub bandwagon, and will be posting about it all summer long)
Camelina Oil*
Homemade whole grain mustard
Topped with a little bit of our homemade pickled onions (post soon!)
When we make salad dressing, we like to keep it simple. Be sure to include an oil, something with acidity, and something to emulsify. We throw everything into a mason jar, screw on the lid, and shake shake shake. 

Hopefully this serves as a jumping off point for making yourself a healthful, seasonal meal with what you have growing in your neck of the woods.

XO
*Camelina Oil has recently become available at our Farmer’s Market. It’s made up of about 35% (!) Omega 3’s, has an incredibly high smoking temp, and is grown locally! We also picked up some seeds, which are very similar to Chia and can be thrown in just about everything. Learn more here.
ZoomInfo

After a gloriously sunny weekend filled with bike riding, farmer’s marketing, picnicing, and gardening, starting the work week didn’t seem so bad. Especially, since the sun stuck around.

We both had yesterday afternoon off, so we grabbed our new favorite lunch (thai green papaya salad), ran a few errands, and took on a project that needed to happen about 2 years ago; we cleaned all of our windows inside and out.

The difference it made is insane, especially since our old home has so many big windows and we were thoroughly exhausted by the time we were done. Remedy? A short little cat nap, followed by drinks and dinner on the porch. So tasty & restorative, and made me that much more excited about this whole “summer” thing.

On last night’s menu:

Fresh Nectarine Cocktail 

  • 1 Nectarine
  • 2oz Rum
  • 3/4oz Lemon Juice
  • 1 tsp Sugar
  • Soda Water
  • Garnish of Pineapple Sage from our yard

Blend up all of the ingredients except the soda water, and put through a strainer (we use a jelly bag). Add ice, and top with a splash of soda water.

_  _  _

Homemade Lupini Beans with Red Pepper Flake + Rosemary (will post on this perfect Italian drinking snack soon!)

_  _  _

BBQ Tofu - this is always something we wing based on what protein/other ingredients we have around the house

  • Skewered Firm Tofu
  • Nick’s Hot Sauce (essentially dried peppers + white vinegar blended)
  • Camelina Oil*
  • Lemon Juice
  • Garlic

_  _  _

Kale Salad with Nectarine, Peas from the garden + a Rhubarb Shrub Dressing (again, we just kind of throw these together with what we have on hand)

  • Rhubarb Shrub (you best believe we’ve hopped on the cocktail shrub bandwagon, and will be posting about it all summer long)
  • Camelina Oil*
  • Homemade whole grain mustard
  • Topped with a little bit of our homemade pickled onions (post soon!)

When we make salad dressing, we like to keep it simple. Be sure to include an oil, something with acidity, and something to emulsify. We throw everything into a mason jar, screw on the lid, and shake shake shake. 

Hopefully this serves as a jumping off point for making yourself a healthful, seasonal meal with what you have growing in your neck of the woods.

XO

*Camelina Oil has recently become available at our Farmer’s Market. It’s made up of about 35% (!) Omega 3’s, has an incredibly high smoking temp, and is grown locally! We also picked up some seeds, which are very similar to Chia and can be thrown in just about everything. Learn more here.